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Full text of "Microcosm"

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Tke 1950 

Microcosm 

of 



Simmons College 

300 Ine I enwaj 



Bo 



ston 



DED 




"Isn't it strange that princes and kings, 
And clowns that caper in sawdust rings, 
And common folks like you and me, 
Are builders for eternity?" 



^olleqe eJLibi 



ran 



V 



ICATION 



To the future generation of students we 
dedicate this book, that they may be "The 
people who get on in the world, the people 
who get up and look for circumstances they 
want, and if they can't find them, make 
them." 






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CONTENTS 




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DDBDD 



WHAT WE ARE 



Administration 

Faculty 

Student Government 




WHAT WE DO 



Schools 




WHERE WE GO 




Candids 


Cover Girls 


Clubs 


Dorm 


Commuters 


Traditions 


WHO WE ARE 


Freshmen 


1950 Flashes 


. Sophomore 


Senior Mosts 


Junior 


Senior Class 



WHAT WE ARE 



We are a student committee elected 
with the power to make decisions, 
voice opinions, and guide the student 
body. We are a working organization, 
sponsoring all-college events, attempt- 
ing to coordinate activities and co- 
operate with student opinion; our work 
extends beyond the four walls of the 
main building and the nine hours of a 
school day. The faculty approve our 
independence and stand by, ready to 
help. We are members of Student 
Government; we are friends of the 
faculty. 






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10 




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Mi« Clifi 



ton 



As our most distinguished transfer, Simmons' 
new Dean was probably as bewildered as any 
first-year student when she arrived at the Fen- 
way. However, she soon established herself as 
a permanent fixture on the Simmons scene, and 
is now handling the 1600 varieties of problems 
that arise in a year's work. We, of the senior 
class, wish to extend our greetings to Elizabeth 
Clifton who already has made herself the friend 
of every student. 



II 



Opportunity to JWeet lour J acuity 



Favorite Woman Instructor, Mrs. Isabella 
Coulter. 





Favorite Man Instructor, Mr. Leonard Silk. 



12 



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This is the faculty, the backbone of our college. Their 
stimulating discussions point the way to alert, free-thinking 
minds. Now, as the yearbook goes to press, we hereby 
forgive them for each surprise quiz, I 500 word paper, and 
"undeserved" low mark they gave us — and bless them for 
the undeserved A's as well. 



13 



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We feel that after four years we know our faculty pretty well. . . . 
Only we know them not as faculty but as people just like ourselves. They 
have their idiosyncracies and mannerisms and personality quirks; after 
four years we've been fairly successful in ferreting out all of these 
distinctions that make our faculty members individuals ... we may not 
yet have divined the reason for Mr. Sypher's conservative ties, but who 
will forget the famous Sypherism, "Am I clear?" usually delivered after 
something abstruse as an explanation of Romeo and Juliet according to 
Marxian dialectic? Who will forget Mr. Johnson's wide, wide grin or 
Mr. Edgell's beard and his own peculiar saunter? Or Mr. Fessenden's 
"Acc-racy, acc-racy, acc-racy!" Or Miss Matlack's overwhelming en- 
thusiasm for anything she teaches? And who will forget Mr. Nitchie's 
brow of genius and abstracted gaze as he (presumably) putters around 
on his peak in Darien? Or Mrs. Coulter's question, "How many see 
what I mean?" Who will forget having a cigarette with Mr. Rankin 
in the backyard? Or who will forget listening to Mr. Palmer's 
devastating retorts in debate, formal or otherwise? As freshmen we 
were probably overawed and overwhelmed by them as college profes- 
sors, "The Faculty." Gradually they became just profs, and now as 
seniors we view them fondly with affection and favoritism. Although 
we may not remember all that they taught us, we won't forget them. 



Mr. Wylie Sypher 
1950 Class Advisor 



14 




Coy glances from Mr. Needham. 




Doublecheck in the Business Office. 





At ease in the English Office. 




A.s Y on _Like 1 1 



lem 




Mr. Batchelder balances the budget. 




Dr. Readdy finds a spare hour for lunch. 




Dr. Timm will have to argue Miss Granara 
out of fhis one. 




Casual philosophy from Mr. Bliss on Class 
Day. 



16 





Lunch has varying effects on the faculty. 



Mr. Neal gives veterans advice on how to 
live on 80 a month. 



Miss Danielson, Director of Students on 
Upperclass Campus, receives. 





The faculty takes a few minutes out — Dr. 
Timm and Mr. Welfling indulge in a 
vigorous game while Mr. Byers and Mr. 
Shaffer blow smoke signals. 




"Miss Hayes, take an atom." 



17 



Opportunity lor Oeli~vxovernmeiit 




Dot Rose, Stu-G President. 



Rea Kiefer, Chairman, Honor Board. 



Pat Powers, Stu-G Vice-President. 



18 



At the helm, Stu-G Council portions our 
pennies, dicusses our problems. 



Honor board receives honorable mentions. 



Stu-G is our Congress and our Dr. 
Anthony. Its council — six senior 
officers, the Editor of News and 
Chairman of NSA. plus a dorm stu- 
dent and commuter from each class 
— decides when we'll have Pay Day, 
ski-weekends or a bridge tournament. 
The Council members are busy girls 
with each member a head of various 
sub-committees. One is the Chairman 
of Honor Board, another the Chair- 
man of the Social Activities Com- 
mittee, and V.P. holds down the 
chairmanships of both Dorm Council 
and Dorm Board. 

When the officers add a chairman 
from each dorm to their group they 
become the Dorm Council, the group 
which plans recreation for the dorm- 
dwellers. Members from Dorm Coun- 
cil are chosen to form Dorm Board. 
Three Seniors, two Juniors, one 








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The arm of the law, teaching all dorm 
students from freshmen to seniors. 

19 



Sophomore and one Freshman are 
included in this judicial group which 
meets once a week to investigate 
violations of dormitory rules and 
pronounce sentence. 

Besides planning recreation from 
week to week, Stu-G sponsors special 
activities which have become tradi- 
tions. There's Olde English Din- 
ner, for instance. Every year, Stu-G 
shakes out its medieval costumes and 
invites the seniors to gather around 
the boar's head on the rough slab 
table. Everyone grasps his knife 
firmly, and while caroling and 
strolling players lend authenticity, 
"demolish ve victuals." 




But Olde English is a seniors-only 
affair, and to say Merry Christmas 
to the rest of the college, Stu-G 
sponsors its annual dance, with non- 
profit prices, so that everyone can 
afford to come. 

Field Day is an all-college event 
which allows Stu-G an opportunity 
to combine the Gay Nineties and 
1950. There is a Sunday-school picnic 
spirit to the box lunches and taffy 
apples, to the singing and the bazaars, 
but there's a definite 1950 twist in 
the blue jeans and baseball-for-young- 
ladies. The faculty hasn't a chance? ? ? 



The girls who insure our social 
security — The Social Activities 
Committee. 



Stu-G Open Meeting discusses 
beefs and solicits comments. 



"Janie, pin a rose on Ree." 
Audrey Keifer, honor board chair- 
man, receives a corsage from 
retiring chairman, Jane Bond. 





"The object of the Board shall 
be the education of the students 
with respect to maintaining con- 
duct . . ." 



20 



"The object of the Association 
is to . . . further the general 
interests of the student body . . ." 






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Key to self-government once more 
changes hands. 



Kay is the belle of the ball while 
Santa Nat gives out with candy 
kisses. 



Stomping at the Statler. Stu-G's 
Christmas Formal. 



The Chairman of Social Activ- 
ities . . . shall have charge of 
... all social activities . . ." 




21 



WHAT WE DO 



We do our share of work and al- 
though we complain that school inter- 
feres with our education, somehow, 
when we leave 300 The Fenway, our 
book-learning and intellectual curiosity 
remains. We discover our ability to 
stand on our own feet financially and 
to develop our interests gained while 
in college. The school we choose, the 
instructors we are assigned, the sub- 
jects we take, all become essential 
background material for future posi- 
tions. With a combination of liberal 
arts and practical vocational training, 
we become confident individuals — of 
our capabilities and our training and 
our determination to display them 
both. We are prepared to live inde- 
pendently as well as collectively. 




Anything for an "A" ... if grades were 
only measured by the pound. 



Scribunal's give-away quiz program, 
swers submitted in shorthand. 



An- 



1 here 5 a liitiire lor the well-edited b 



usmess eirJ 




"The Business School? Oh, that's a snap!" 
most Simmonsites who aren't in the know 
will glibly tell you. But don't believe every- 
thing you hear. They'd eat those words if 
they underwent one of the notorious Intro- 
duction to Business exams that expect you 
to memorize the textbook down to the last 



B 



usmess 



24 



comma, or tried to discipline a stubborn 

income statement that refused to balance. To 
this, add a sprinkling of Shakespeare, and 
some assorted Historys, and you've just about 
got it. 

Students in the School of Business study 
vocational courses against a broad back- 
ground in liberal arts. They may specialize 
in the field of advertising, personnel, account- 
ing, office management, inter-American rela- 
tions, or secretarial work — medical, scientific, 
or general. But — they also have a general 
knowledge and a lot of good judgment, a 
combination that enables them to advance 
quickly into responsible jobs. 

And don't think for a minute that the stu- 
dent's knowledge of business is all "bookish." 
Besides becoming familiar with the various 
trade publications, thev acquire technical 
skills under conditions that approximate as 
nearly as possible those in actual offices. In 
the Spring of their senior year, they spend 
two weeks in field study in their chosen field. 

This year "Mr. Salsgiver's School" intro- 
duced a new course in Business Policies and 
Management designed to acquaint the student 




Man of Distinction. 



with management's problems by the case study 
method and by interviewing executives of 
Greater Boston firms. 

"The Business School? Oh. that's a snap!" 
If you're still not in the know, talk to any 
Business School girl and she'll set you straight. 



Yours very truly, the 
Scribunal Officers. 





Valzing to the counterpoint of type 
harmonies. 



I on don t m 



lave to spe 



ak the h 



guag( 



anquaee 




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A strange group of people attend Simmons Col- 
lege. Distinguished from the rest of the students 
hy their red-rimmed eyes and pencil-blackened 
hands and faces and general worldly appearance, 
these creatures inhabit Room 352 and 351, only 
coming out for air or food when it is absolutely 
necessary. All they do for hours on end is pick up 



English 



26 



commas which some careless individual has dropped 
and insert them into the proper places. This group 
is also unique in that they never read literary 
masterpieces, they merely measure them; the only 
characters they are concerned with are a, b, c, etc. 

These students have a strange and wonderful 
language all their own. A signature is not only a 
scribble at the bottom of a check, but a sheet of 
paper folded in a way similar to an Esso road map; 
only an M.I.T. background could figure out which 
crease comes first. The term inches is considered a 
bourgeois infiltration ; pica is the authorized meas- 
uring unit. And when you hear these creatures 
talking in the corridors (between 352 and 351, of 
course) about "Bleed cuts not running into the 
gutter," don't be alarmed; this is the one situation 
which Scotch Tape and Kleenex cannot remedy. In 
case you ever want to enter the sacred confines of 
Room 351, remember the pass word is, "Have you 
done your Valz?" It works every time. 

If by chance you happen to find yourself in the 
same room with a member of this cult, you may 
discuss the merits of Bodoni as opposed to Chelten- 
ham type or argue about the Chicago Manual of 
Style's case on hyphenation or show her why "Fez" 
accused her of committing libel in her last jour- 
nalism paper. These are good safe subjects. 

This group of girls is unique in another sense; 
the majority of them are English majors who don't 




Boz upholds the pica rule. 



plan to teach or write. In the School of English, the 
technical side of the language is stressed, so that a 
girl can go into publishing, journalism, advertising 
or any other field that deals with the printed word, 
the Black Art. She will emerge from the English 
School with enough know-how to publish her own 
magazine from cover to cover. But meanwhile, until 
the dream of "Jane Smith, Editor" materializes, 
typing and shorthand, her favorite subjects now, 
should keep her in pencils and crackers later. 



Proofreading is Bliss. Sleepless 
nights with commas and periods 
going through our heads. 





v^liem, l^arbolrydrates and JJicarb 



recipe lor good living 



Miss Robb's formula for successful home 
management. 



Take a handful of spotless uniforms, mix vig- 
orously with a pound of pins and a dash of liberal 
arts, add a taste of field work, live for four years 
on the third floor at a moderate temperature (70°) 
and voila!!, approximately thirty-two parchment 
diplomas! No. it isn't magic; this process is known 
as Dr. Elda Robb's own tested recipe for four-year 
B (utter) S(cotch) Delights, for the Home Eco- 



nomics School teaches its students to plan a well- 
balanced academic program as well as a well- 
balanced meal. 

The Home Economics girls are the ones who 
get college credits for cooking meals and making 
their own clothes. They operate the "Simmons 
Delicatessen'' on the third floor. Here, working 
in new labs completely equipped with modern 
kitchen facilities, the students conjure up those 
tantalizing odors of ibacon and eggs that are disas- 
trous to the morals of any non-Home Ec-er who 
happens to miss breakfast and has a first hour class 
near the kitchen lab. In these food courses, the 
students really get something tangible out of their 
college education — and if their envious friends are 
good, sometimes they are given a crumb or two 
of an old pot roast or pastry. 



Preparations for what may be a grande fete. 






Putting some light on the subject of 
Home Ec. 



Teaching the Home Ec girls how to cut a 
rug. 



They are the only students at Simmons who are 
actually encouraged to knit in class; their creative 
talents are not stifled; instead they learn to design 
and make their own clothes in sewing classes. They 
also have courses in clothing selection, home man- 
agement and child development. However, their 
schedule isn't all play; they have to learn the 
science behind these skills and so biology and 
chemistry are added to their curriculum with lib- 
eral arts electives rounding out their education. 

With all this training, the Home Ec students 
can specialize in general home ec for teaching jobs 
or in institutional management, or in textiles, but 
whatever branch they choose, they will know more 
than just how to boil water when they set up house- 
keeping on their own. In the Home Economics 
School, Dr. Robb offers a sure-fire recipe for a 
tasty college education. 



-Home 

l/cononucs 




29 




Dev/ey do or Dewey don't. 



.Library Otudents are caught between card catalogs 
ana references books 




Despite the quips and barbs the students 
in the School of Library Science are subject 
to. they are outstanding as Simmon's-most- 
sought-after graduates. But this isn't the only 
unique aspect of the Library School. Unlike 
any other school, specialization in vocational 



.Library 

Ocience 



30 



training is offered only during the Senior 
year. For three years, library students can 
philander in any field of liberal arts that 
appeals to them until the ax falls. And, 
according to the students, that ax has a mighty 
sharp edge that can "Cutter" off your head. 

Like a Greek chorus, the library seniors 
wail that they just don't have enough time 
for all that work in cataloguing and classifi- 
cation and reference. They also complain 
about the unruly typewriters and shared 
desks in Room 318 and stoutly maintain that 
they are all doomed to bifocals, because their 
work ruins their eyesight. But still, bravely 
chancing all these factors, the students are 
offered a vast vista of jobs when they graduate. 

However, the future "li-brehr-ians" do not 
spend all their time making noise on the 
fourth-floor library; they make pilgrimages 
to the BPL to find where all the books are 
hidden that can't be taken out anyway. They 
also trek over to the famed Atheneum al- 
though they still don't understand why, be- 
cause they can't handle any books there un- 
less they have paid a $5.00 deposit. 

Plans are now in progress to reorganize 
the present undergraduate program offered 
at Simmons and extend it into a fifth year, 




Kenneth Schaffer, Director of Library 
School. 



but until then, the fourth-year library stu- 
dents will continue to struggle with the Dewey 
Decimal System in Library A or B as they 
try to decide exactly what books they need. 
Someone else will always have the book they 
want, but somehow Simmons will continue 
turning out top-notch librarians. 



How would you classify these? 












Ann Strong honors its founder. 



Nursing school tete-a-tete. 



ive vears 



t 



then a JLiIe -Long Career 




She's got a starched cap and a thermometer, and 
bo-bby-sox and blue-jeans; she's got a history book 
and a copy of Grey's Anatomy; one semester she 
carries books, and the second semester she carries 
bed pans; she's got a B.S. and an R.N. — all in five 
years. 

For three years, Simmons' potential Florence 
Nightingales take cultural and scientific courses, 
and then are whisked off into the maze of white 
corridors and rubber-heeled shoes that constitute 
a hospital. After an eight-week "hell-week" in this 
antiseptic atmosphere, the really stiff part looms 



32 



before them — the ordinary three years of practical 
training concentrated into two. This year, the 
nurses found that something new had been added 
to their curriculum. In order to follow all the 
new changes in modern medicine, the Nursing 
School for the first time was incorporated into 
the Radcliff training program at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. Under the expert supervision 
of the various hospital departments, courses i'n 
psychosomatics, the social and health and preventive 
aspects of illness are now tailored to the college 
students' level of understanding. 

The next two years, the students spend in hos- 
pitals affiliated with the School of Nursing — Boston 
Lying-in, Children's, and McLean. In their fifth 
year, the nurses' training is supplemented by field 
work in public health nursing under the Boston 
Visiting Nurses Association. In the last half of 
their fifth year, the nurses, now full}' acquainted 
with all aspects of their field, return to Simmons' 
masses of hypochondriacal humanity; a cut finger 
attains the importance of a broken arm if a fifth 
year nurse is within yelling distance. 

If by the end of their last year, the nurses still 
have the higher-than-average degree of stamina 
that they needed to carry them through, they finally 
get their reward — a B.S. and an R.N. 




Mrs. Morris directs her girls through five 
years of hospital and college corridors. 



N 



ursing 



Fourth year nurses take time out from the thermometers. 





J. o these Ocholastic -N omads^ a _D. O. 
onrv a beeinnini 



15 



L y 



'S 1 



Dr. Harrison Harley, Director of the School 
of Preprofessional Studies. 



In a school as professional as Simmons — 
a place where you cannot turn around with- 
out bumping into a potential scientist, secre- 
tary, nurse, or journalist, someone had to 
make a provision for those poor kids who 
simply don't want to go out into the cold 
world with just a B.S.; and so some enter- 



prising individual did, and he called it the 
School of Preprofessional Studies . . . better 
known as Prepro. 

Wandering among the other students who 
talk in terms of thermometers, typewriters, 
and typefaces, they may feel out-of-step, but 
they stick by their psych and lit courses with 



Psych students analyze Dean's dreams. 






Aristotle, Plato and the abstract. 



their goal firmly in mind. They have the 
ambition to go on for a Masters or Ph.D., for 
these girls are the embryo social workers, 
lawyers, doctors, and teachers of Simmons. 
With the loyal help of Dr. Harley, they plan 
a curriculum that encompasses sociology, 
economics, languages, and any other course 
that relates to the field they plan to enter. 
Although they suffer the merciless teasing of 
the other schools, the students in Prepro 
achieve martyr-like proportions when they 
walk around with armfuls of catalogues and 
applications for graduate schools. 

Prepro does not have its own special club, 
but the students manage to have a finger in 
every pie. They are active in political organ- 
izations as well as dramatic groups; they dis- 
cuss foreign policy as well as schizophrenia: 
and in their spare time, they do volunteer 
work in settlement houses and hospitals 
throughout the Boston area. 

As the newest school at Simmons, Prepro 
offers its students a sound background that 
qualifies them for professional training. The 
class of '50 foresees for its Prepro girls a 
stimulating future — whatever it may be. 



_r reprotessionai 
Otuoies 





Prince students take some fashion notes. 



A taste ol retailing belore the jl). O. 




Taxi! Taxi! That's the battle cry of Prince 

students. Every morning they risk crooked stock- 
ing seams and creased skirts as they pile six apiece 
( count 'em) into the. cabs waiting to take them to 
school. Those Prince girls really lead a rough life 
— just imagine trying to light a cigarette in such 
over-crowded transportation facilities. When they 
each have crossed the cabbie's palm with silver, 
they enter the corridors of 49 Commonwealth Av- 
enue to the tune of crinkling paperbag lunches and 
the tapping of heels. Thus starts a morning of 
retailing, classes. 



36 



But everything is not the same at Prince this 
year. The school has achieved the new look — 
MEN. They are only in the graduate courses, but 
their presence has made those famous Wednesday 
morning coffee hours very interesting. Juniors 
will have more opportunity to appreciate this addi- 
tion next year when they take all their classes at 
Prince; under the new academic program launched 
this September, the juniors divide their time be- 
tween the Fenway and Commonwealth Avenue, 
whereas previously the retailing school monopo- 
lized their last two years at Simmons. 

With this new system, students will have to wait 
until their senior year to apply their class notes 
to actual practice; the Class of '50 was the last to 
have field work in the junior as well as senior 
years. In the busy weeks before Christmas, the 
Princesses worked as junior executives (for the 
most part) in retail stores all over the country 
from San Francisco to Atlanta. While the rest of 
the college was trying to sleep through that first 
hour class, the future-Dorothy Schaeffers were 
wide-awake boarding the bus on their way to work. 
The transformation from skirts and sweaters, to 
hats and gloves and stockings was amazing and 
caused innumerable comments. At the dorm if 
any other student happened to be up at that hour, 
the Prince girls got no sympathy, only, "A date — 
at this hour?!" However, the rest of Simmons has 
to concede that the retailing students maintain the 
slickest appearance of any other group on campus. 




Mr. Beckley asks: "How much am I 
offered?" 



rnuce ochool 
ol Xvetailmg 



Jean Branaghan and Mary Sims keep Prince 
up to par socially. 



What happened to the center of interest 
in this picture? 





What's the latest police report? 



Just a drop in the beaker. 



J\. beaker ol knowledge, a book ol Iormulas 

ana a job 




The School of Science offers a haven to all 
embryonic Einsteins at Simmons. No matter what 
scientific bent a girl may have, the Science School 
can and does provide the courses she wants. Until 
recently a science student majored in biology, chem- 
istry, math or physics, but now the fields of orthop- 
tics and physiotherapy have been added to round 
out the list. 

Usually, a girl who is slated for the Science 
School begins her major (unofficially) in her fresh- 
man year. If she manages to withstand the rigors 
of freshman math and/or chemistry, she then com- 
mits herself to the Science School in her sopho- 
more year and begins her three year toil in a maze 
of physics, bio, chemistry and math courses. 



38 



As far as the other students can fathom, a chem 
major spends most of her time in retreat in one 
of the many dim, cell-like cubicles on the second 
floor amid test tubes, beakers, and Bunsen burners 
and sadistically brews that familiar malodorous 
smoke or hydrogen sulphide that billows -out in- 
sidiously into the halls and lungs. A bio major 
down at the other end of the hall manages to con- 
tribute her share of redolence to the environment 
if she happens to be dissecting a specimen that is 
embalmed in formaldehyde. The newly-installed 
corridor doors should eliminate this atmospheric 
chaos, but they only seem to concentrate the poison- 
ous vapors. 

Besides the standard sciences of chem and bio, 
two new departments have been added to the Science 
School's listing: orthoptics for a girl wanting solid 
professional training to assist an oculist and physio- 
therapy. The physical therapy major doesn't spe- 
cialize until her fourth year, and then continues 
her studies for an extra fifth year, that is (or do 
they only brew smoke in those alchemists' quar- 
ters?). 

When the years of such diverse technical training 
are over, the students in the School of Science are 
prepared to work as chemists, research assistants, 
analysts — almost anything. They enter the outer 
world with the omniscient look of one who under- 
stands the universe (a la Einstein). 




Take it from Timm. 



Sci 



cience 



Helen Chin and June Murray spell Ellen 
Richards. 



Simmons' mighty crew of atom smashers. 





40 



WHERE WE GO 



We go looking for others to share 
our interests — to hike, to stage a play, 
to hear music, to speak French, to 
further understanding of our religions, 
our politics, our future work. We are 
able to find other students with our 
interests and ambitions by taking ac- 
tive part in the clubs we join* We share 
the opportunity to hear speakers dis- 
cuss problems over a cup of coffee 
and make excursions to the clubs of 
other colleges where we can enjoy 
their events. We are given an oppor- 
tunity to enjoy social give and take, 
cultivate friendships and broaden our 
outlook. We know that this is as much 
a part of our college education as our 
academic curricula. 




Audrey Stewart, Ginny Willon, Lucy Blaha. 



Clin 



nstian Ocience 

Unlike Simmons' other religious groups, the 
Christian Science Organization does not confuse the 
outsider with an obscure title. Its name is re- 
freshingly self-explanatory. 

The club's chief function is holding regular 
weekly meetings, which all interested students may 
attend. Here a volunteer student reader gives a 
lesson on Christian Science which she herself has 
prepared. For these meetings, the organization has 
overcome the four-ten bugaboo by scheduling them 
for a free hour common to all members. 

In the fall, the Club holds a reception to welcome 
new members and combats freshmen's timidity 



Ginny Willon serves at a Christian Science 
Reception. 



with the proven device of serving refreshments. The 
acquaintances begun at this first meeting are re- 
newed at the group's occasional Wednesday night 
dinner-out, dutch treat, of course — followed by 
services at the Mother Church. At the end of the 
year, the Club's activities culminate in an annual 
formal lecture open to all students. 

During the year, members can attend informal 
lectures sponsored by the Christian Science chapters 
in neighboring colleges. In its turn, the Simmons 
Christian Science Organization never fails to pro- 
vide a memorable speaker. 



Hillel 



Gerri Adler, Charlotte 
Glazer, Phyllis Mishara. 



Bu 



sney, 



Esthe 




Remember when you were fourteen and started 
to go to parties? Remember how the boys held up 
one wall and the girls the other? Remember what 
an ordeal it was to get the "twain to meet?" 
We couldn't tell you Hillel's secret formula but 
they've got the solution down to an absolute science. 

This snappy group holds a get-acquainted dance 
early in the season that is enough to sweep any 
unsuspecting freshman off her twinkling toes. If 
she's lonely in Boston, she is given her chance to 
meet the current crop of eligible males; if she isn't 
lonely, it may prove interesting anyhow. 

There are at least two big dances held during the 
year, so more than one Hillel girl has met her One 
and Only at a "Rat Race." 

Cultural events held in conjunction with Har- 
vard, BU. Tufts, and Tech, a busy schedule of 
educational classes, meetings, and religious studies 
make it a sure-fire club. 



Orthod 



ox 



The Orthodox Club, a fairly new organization at 
Simmons, has been an active club throughout its 
existence. Socials, discussions, lectures, and joint 
meetings with other clubs are held throughout the 
year. 

A tradition of the Club is its open meetings. This 
year, the first open meeting was held in the lounge 
with Father Stephen Upson of the Syrian Orthodox 
Church as guest speaker. He discussed the liturgy of 
the Orthodox church and showed slides for further 
clarification. He also discussed the differences between 
the liturgy of the Orthodox church and other de- 
nominations. 

As is the custom, coffee and refreshments were served 
following the lecture, and an open discussion period 
followed with everyone participating. Students from 
nearby colleges attended, and everyone sat around in 
a semi-circle with Father Upson as the center and 
discussed everything from Euthanasia to church mar- 
riages. 

But the club has its social life as well. Early in 
November a successful social was held in the Charter 
Room of the New England Mutual Hall, with students 
of other colleges participating. 

A joint meeting with the Hellenic Club of M.I.T. 
was held in March with a social following; a tea for 
the mothers of the members was given at the St. Moritz 
Hotel in April. 

Newman officers pose on the stairs. 





Seva Joakim, Catherine Constas, Jennie 
Sikalis. 



N 



ewman 



Religious, intellectual, social — that's the three- 
fold purpose of the Newman Club. Named for 
Cardinal Newman, it is a national organization of 
Catholic students in non-sectarian colleges. 

The Simmons Club this year emphasized the in- 
tellectual. Chaplain Father McDonnell insists that. 
''You can't expect to meet secular learning on a 
college level with a high school knowledge of vour 
religion." And he has done far more than talk 
about the deficit. One meeting a month he devoted 
to a "question box" period — -answering student 
questions. The lecture meetings proved equally 
popular — there the Father correlated Catholic doc- 
trine with college courses. 

Another innovation of 1949-50, this time in a 
religious vein, was the establishment of a lending 
library. Somehow, the Newmanites made time, 
between term papers and exams, to take advantage 
of the collection of current Catholic books. 

As always, the big religious event of the year 
was the annual Mother-daughter Communion 
Breakfast in May. 

Of course, the Club does not neglect the social 
side completely. The activities of the New England 
Province of Newman Clubs naturally included 
Simmons — ski weekends, dances and pre-holiday 
parties. But the "closed" affairs with M.I.T., Holy 
Cross, B.U.S.P.R., will be remembered longest bv 
the Simmons-Newman alumnae. 




re nc 



1, 



Parlez-vous francais? That's what Le Circle 
did this year, with French students and people 
recently returned from France. But we took out 
time for a little English when Mr. Sypher spoke 
on Gide's novels. This was a particularly inem- 
orable occasion, naturally. 



vjrlee Uub 



There are seventy girls in Simmons who can carry a 
tune and they all belong to the Glee Club. For the 
Simmons Songsters are singing on a new key this year 
with double the number of members, twice as many 
rehearsals, and a tremendous increase in enthusiasm 
and response. 

Under the capable direction of Mr. Burton A. Cleaves, 
the Glee Club has spent an active and successful year. 
Beginning with an assembly on December 5, the Glee 
Club has sung many concerts. The traditional vespers 
at St. Paul's Church in Brookline before Christmas, the 



French Club officers 



Other meetings were devoted to the Club itself 
and its problems — which are numerous. Our 
Christmas meeting concentrated mostly on food, 
but Simone Henline, who's here from Paris, 
described some of the French Christmas customs 
and legends, especially those that differ from 
ours. 

Maybe this roster of activities gives you some 
idea of the purpose and function of Le Circle 
Francais — those who weren't members, that is. 
Those who were members already know that the 
club was originally organized to meet the de- 
mand for opportunities to use their French 
outside class and to foster interest in things 
French. In past years the group has also con- 
centrated on outside projects with settlement 
children and orphans; this year the group was 
small enough so that more individual practice 
with the language itself was possible. 

Now Le Circle is making plans for next year 
which include merging with other language 
groups to augment the social programs and to 
increase membership and funds. With a little 
pushing, Le Circle will go even farther than it 
has in past years! 



Christmas Pageant in cooperation with the Dramatic 
Club and the Modern Dance group, and on January 12 
a special concert at the Gardner Museum. In the spring 
they held joint concerts with M.I.T. and Worcester Tech, 
and in June they sang at Simmons Baccalaureate and 
Commencement exercises. 

Commuters and dorm students find equal interest in 
the organization and it isn't infrequently that you will 
hear someone shouting around 4:10, "Sorry can't meet! 
Have a Glee Club rehearsal — with Mr. Cleaves!" 



Glee Club officers smile at their obvious success. 



The Glee Club heightens the Christmas spirit. 





© ( ">£il & a 



The wearing of the gold and blue — 
Academy. 



Academy reception. Very swish. 



Acad 



em 



y 



Not until seven years ago did Academy become the 
official Honor Society of Simmons. Before that date, the 
Club was open to those scholars who excelled only in liberal 
arts subjects; the technical subjects were not considered. 

Each year in November, the new members are initiated 
into Academy by means of a formal reception to which 
faculty are invited. The guest speaker this year was Dr. 



Albert Roy, Associate Librarian at Boston University's 
College of Business Administration. 

The blue and gold ribbon that Academy seniors wear 
under the collars of their graduation gowns is not there 
merely for decoration. There's a great deal more to Acad- 
emy than that. There's the respect, the wonder, the awe 
of how any girl can maintain an average like that. 

Academy students weather the merciless teasing that their 
vulnerable position subjects them to and become a neces- 
sary part of the student body. 



Poster planning. 



oster 



C 



ommittee 



A girl walking down the corridor with a 
square yard of cardboard tucked under her 
arm . . . another poster is ready and all set to 
be tacked up alongside a dozen others in the 
corridor known as Poster Row. Come exams. 
15 cent MTA fares and fire doors, the paint 
brush crowd always on the job with paint, ink. 
varnish and paste. No job is too big, none too 
small and all are given the same consideration 
and are executed and rendered in a manner 
which would do credit to Rembrandt. 

But that's not all; that which is tacked up 
must also be taken down and a member of the 
Club assumes the responsibility of watching 
dates and posters. Notice how neat Poster Row 
is this year? Those girls really follow a job 
throush. 




JJagpipes, _L)allooii5, JVlr. Issac Lrooksnank — 




Editor Ginger Bown favors the camera with 
a time-consuming smile. 




WHU 




MIC's publicity theme, in the person of 
Angus Murdoch, demonstrates the High- 
land Fling. 



Overseer Elsie Frabotta checks on part of 
the MIC staff, Arlene Wattenmaker, 
Anfy Pappajohn, and Jennie Sikalis. 




46 



a 



11 lor the love ol JVlic 



To satisfy the curiosity of the curious, the malice 
of the malicious and the Ego of the Staff, we include 
between these covers of our MIC '50, that informa- 
tion which is so desired. 

We knew we had to learn — fast. We wasted as 
little time as possible getting started. Lainy raced 
around, tearing her hair out meeting the photography 
schedule. Ginger and Elsie, the eager crowd, started 
the initial task of getting their ideas down on paper 
before they lost their grasp on them. Summer brought 
about a separation of the Staff that seemed almost 
fatal, except for the existence of the U. S. Post Office 
and the Bell Telephone System. 

A theme was our primary concern: we found that a 
layout as a theme would help do the trick. Instead of 
looking back too much, we would concentrate our 
efforts on what the students were doing the year we 
graduated, and if there were any emphasis, it should 
be one directed to the future. Our theme, then, became 
"live for today and plan for the future." So we planned 
a book of the future — which in the future would be a 
reflection of what we did today. 




Babe Russell, Jean Morgan and Barbara 
Brown ponder over whether MIC's aspira- 
tions and finances might possibly fit. 



Practicality and artistry confer. Ellaine La- 
Course, Photography Editor, Jean Mor- 
gan, Business Manager, and Ellen Gould, 
Art Editor. 




In the fall the assignments were handed out. and it 
was every man for himself trying to beat the deadline. 
Arlene and her literary staff worked behind diction- 
aries and calenders of events; Barb counted money 
and subscription receipts with great anticipation; 
Jennie was seen more than one Saturday trespassing 
on the premises of possible advertisers of Boston and 
vicinity; Jean calculated expenses by her weeklv ex- 
cursion between the comptroller's office and the treas- 
urer of Student Government: and the final task of 
proofreading and checking fell into the hands of 
Jennie Guarino. 

We did take one week off to plug MIC Dance in 
November. The publicity staff concocted every con- 
ceivable stunt to promote the event from Angus march- 
ing through the refectory in kilts and bagpipe, to 
students throwing balloons down the stair well into 
the front hall at school. Then we settled back to 
work again — and came forth with this — MICROCOSM 
1950. 



47 



Editor's All 




"At last we have room to breathe." 
These words have been echoed by every 
member of the two college publications 
edited entirely by students. No longer will 
MIC photos find themselves completely 
lost among News copy, and Tuesday is no 
longer the nightmare of coats, boots and 
books piled ceiling-high on the floor, desks, 
and table. The Editor's Room is always a 
hectic place, but now with the addition of 
two more desks and lots more floor space, 
the Technical Editor of News doesn't have 
to yell quite so loud as before, "Clear the 
table!" One more welcome addition was 
the telephone; the editors were the most 
constant users of the instrument anyway, so 
much energy has been conserved by this 
move. Now, at last, MIC and News can 
stay out of each other's way while com- 
posing their copy. 



Dorothy Hesse, Shirley Sherard, Jane 
Hinchcliffe, and Nancy Stewart look as 
if they've met the NEWS deadline. 



MIC editors Elsie Frabotta and Singer 
Bown wrangle politely over an obvious 
impossibility. 




Editor-in-chief Joe White gets an earful of 
practical advice from NEWS Advertis- 
ing Manager, Myrt Lipton. 



**+■*-* 4-*++++ 



lmraons 












COLD 

PACTS 
PAGE 3 






News while it is News Judy Holden '50 -'51 Editor 



.jCommul At Tech 

Activ© lnt©r©st 



E 






News staff is a working force to 
further student interest and cooperation 
within the college. Its future success is 
assured by faculty-student backing. 



Mrs, St? 




■ ■■ 

___ i _ _ h 

"Hi 



News rolls off the presses at Crimson 
Printing. 



. . ■ 



. Chairman 



■ 
■ ■ ■ 
. . . 



Thursday is News day for the Sim- 
mons student body, but every day is 
News day for the Simmons College 
newspaper staff. Reporters cover, meet- 
ings and interview personalities on and 
} off campus, Wednesday through Friday, 
... and Monday they pound the typewriters 
J trying to get their stories in before the 
4:10 deadline. Then on Tuesday, all 
K chaos erupts. While the editors mark 
up copy and the reporters rewrite it, 
' the technical staff is looking for a two- 
letter word for "existentialism" and 
I wonders whether News uses three or 
I two commas in a series of three. The 
room is a madhouse on Tuesdays until 
4:10 when the printer comes to pick 
up the processed copy while last minute 
headlines are being prepared. 



■ ■■ 



In N*? 



Cv: ; Commi 

QutOu* 






Winter] 
Deodlii 




• ■ . 
■ 

■ ■■■■ 
...■■ . . 

{ contained oi 

(Continued an Past 4) 



■ 

■■ . 

■■ i. 

i tor. announced 

. .■ . . ■ ■ . ■ ■■■ ■ 

■ 

: | . : ■ ■.. ■ -■■ : ' 

urns said. 



On Tuesday afternoons everyone pitches 
in to meet the 4:30 deadline. 



3U( 

■ 
• ■ ■ . ■ ■ 



... 
■ 
■ 



mi ■ 



>wn. 
u<u ■'..)» roak* 

.. >nttnued en Paa« 



.-.■.:■ ■■ - ■ ■ ' ■ ■ : 

Miss Virginia 1 

b, executive 

■ ■ ' ■ 
(Continued on Page 3} 



■ ■ . ' 
le subject of 

Ity Research 
■■-■ the 

s while Mr. 

of the corpo- 
G final 

■ 
-3 re- 
Time. 

if Einstein's 

:>.oger 
:ioa who Is, 
ter an "antt- 
,10 heaT ■ 
avity-ce. 

h the 
etc. 

pects 

omen, 

claims 

■ ■ 
■ 

■■-.el in 

■ ■ 
ience 
■ . . 

en are 
:o be 
: ■ mil 

eaces. 
■ 

i 
■ 



- . . ■ ■ ■ 

in some of the t 

■ . . . ' -v.. ■ 

the news that there arc 

• job opportunities for "*!• 

and social 

howerer, 

loofeed upon as 

the article, and 

{Continued on Page 4) 






The Simmons News 



»<■■* — ** **«■*»»»»***■ « ■*■»*«■»■ 



KJV CLIO I 



WILL SPEAK HERE FRIDAY 



OPEN LETTER 



Commuter's 
Prom 



OPEN LETTER 



udwig Lewisohn 
| Will Discuss Religion 
ssembly 



Mrs. Stetson Colls 
ForVoiunteerWork 
At Boston Hospita 




■ \ :■ ■ ■ : . ■ .■ 

-..■■ 

.■■.■-. 
■ 

... 

■ : . 

■ ■ .■ tlned 

(Continued on Pago 4) 



Almost everyone at Simmons reads the 
Simmons NEWS. 



... .-.■.■.. 
-■■.■ ■ ■ ■. . . ■■ ■:■ 

articles or 
■ Ailllsma said. 



■■ ■ ■ 
.... 

- : ■ ■ ■ . ■■ . . " .■■'■ 

Unions of E 

(Continued on Page 3) 



i 

■ : 

Saving 10 cent* P*r date 

. 
j : : , ■■ . ■ ■ n ■■ ■ ■■ 

executive 

:■. . .■■■■■■.■. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



r le(da 

■ ■ . 

ijcr pro- 
may oe 
. 
od Job opportunities for U- 
■ ■ ■■ ■■ ■ 

erinn, however. 
■ ■ ■ , ■ . 

pioneers, according to the article, and 
(Continued on Page 4) 



"Th 



e outs tan 



din? d 



ramatic groui 



of tk< 



y 



ear 



>> 




Dramatic Club officers off stage. 



The girls at Simmons who \earn for the glamour 
of footlights and bravos find proper outlet in the 
Dramatic Club. Approximately seventy members 
belong, and although they don't all appear behind 
the footlights, the)" are in there pitching behind every 
production. 

The Dramatic Club's winter opus, their first produc- 
tion. Compets, is usually held in Brookline's familiar 
Whitney Hall I remember those creaking chairs?). 
That's not all the Dramatic Club has to contend with: 
this \ear the furniture didn't come; Lizzie Borden 
in the junior play had to brandish her hatchet ever-so- 
gently so that the hatchet-head wouldn't fly off and 
massacre some innocent member of the audience. But 
even after someone forgot to push the doors on stage 
the right way, everything came off as planned. 

According to tradition the seniors directed the 
inter-class compets. A panel of judges — five faculty 
members — and the audience chose the junior class 
play. '"Miss Lizzie Borden."' as the favorite. The cast, 
Shirley Kaplan. Mary Fenno, Joan Reynolds, and 
Sallv McCarthv received the silver loving cup and 
a dozen red roses as their reward for a good job. 

The Dramatic Club's next stint was to participate 
in the Christmas Pageant in conjunction with several 
other groups. The last big production occurred in 
April at the Boston Conservatory of Music Theatre 
where the club members gloried in the conveniences 
of a modern plavhouse. 




Compets turns into a free-for-all. 



The first-nighters are all in their seats. 

52 



Tie Si 



immoiis 



R 



eview 



What's the deadline . . . phone for 
you, Ginny . . . where's my layout 
. . . can't find the galley proofs . . . 
are you sure you sent your caption 
to the printer . . . Betty . . . Can't, 
have an appointment with Marge . . . 
you're asking me if it's a left or 
right hand page . . . this rubber 
cement is so sticky . . . ask Miss 
Williams . . . you're always using 
that typewriter . . . how many points 
in a pica . . . rewrite, rewrite, re- 
write . . . that glossy won't print well 
. . . finish up what you're doing, 
going to have a conference ... if 
you have three million dollars you 
can publish your own magazine . . . 
not enough fiction . . . there's never 
a ruler around . . . may I use the 
scissors when you are through . . . 
does my story lend itself to an in- 
formal layout . . . 




Ginny waits while Dot Williams checks on 
the printer's schedule. 



Marge supervises the selection of photos 
for the next Review. 




Alumnae office, 
please . . . what year did Dorothy 
Yeager graduate . . . '27 . . . yes, 
and see you at 12:30 . . . give East- 
ern Engraving another ring . . . 
that's the slug line . . . how big is 
36 point . . . where are the cuts 
from the last issue . . . • I haven't 
had any cooperation ... we need 
more posters . . . when can you sit 
at hall table ... we need more room 
. . . have a minute to read this over 
. . . don't cut out the tissue overlay, 
that was just for class . . . three 
stories or some production work . . . 
one dollar subscription . . . every- 
thing is done, let's start on the next 
issue. 



53 




Attired in native costume, Ilka Kostal greets 
NSA speaker. 



For Better Rel 



ations 






i- 



Adele Klein, Marion Malis, Shirley Neizer, 
Frances Hoffman. 



When \ou think of summer cruises on the luxurv liner 
""Yolendam. ' and that vou couldn't buv those shoes without a 
10' /C discount, what else could you be thinking of but NSA, and 
more specifically, the Simmons branch of the National Students 
Association. One of the most active groups at Simmons, NSA 
membership includes every student in the college. Nationally, 
the organization represents more than three hundred colleges: 
it is the spokesman for the American college student. 

Hut whenever \ou think of NSA. vou may be sure that your 
train of thought is not entirely self j inspired, for the group's pro- 
lific publicity department puts the name NSA before your eyes 
everv dav in every conceivable way. As long as its activities con- 
tinue to be as interesting as they have been in the past, the Sim- 
mons News will never have to worry about being underset. 

Although it is best known for the purchase card system by 
which the Boston merchants offer students' discounts, and for 
their summer tours to Europe for study, work, and travel, its 
activities are international in scope. 

NSA at Simmons is organized as a committee under Stu-G. 
""Non-sectarian and non-partisan." the organization has as its main 
goal the achievement of academic freedom and the abolishment 
of discrimination of an\ kind and since its establishment in 1947 
it has worked constantly along these lines. 



'to * 




54 



Shirley and Marion met with other repre- 
sentatives at NSA conference. 



The New F 



ew JL orum 




Forum officers plan a program. 



After a six-week trial period in 1949. Forum became the latest 
name added to the roster of Simmons clubs. Actually. Forum 
is not a club in itself, but an executive committee or a parent 
organization that sponsors and directs the activities of certain 
other political groups. Among these other groups are the Student 
League for Industrial Democracy, the Young Republicans Club, 
which is organizing a World Federalist chapter, and the Inter- 
collegiate Zionist Federation of America. All these clubs are 
self-integrated, but because of their interest in political action, 
are governed by Forum. 

Forum's goal is to centralize the various student activities. 
It also aims to crystallize the political interests already present 
in some Simmons students, and to stimulate new political views. 
Simmons until now has suffered from the definite lack of such an 
organization and it is hoped that Forum will fill the gap. 




Forum has mustered the greatest response from students when 
it has tackled political questions of local interest. Its program 
this year has dealt with municipal government. In the fall, 
Forum's Town Meeting was received enthusiastically by the stu- 
dent. Probably one of Forum's outstanding events, the original 
plan was to get the mayoralty candidates themselves to speak at 
Simmons, but instead of the three candidates, Curley, Hynes, 
and McDonough. representatives were sent to talk to the students. 

Forum is not self-supporting: twenty-five cents per student is 
subtracted from the student activities fee and the money is avail- 
able for each member organization. Forum also provides the 
publicity and posters for the participating clubs. Forum has 
done a good job and should continue on its successful path. 



S.L.I.D. officers Peg Lohse, Mona Lipofsky, 
Anne Kyriacopoulos. 



55 




Joan Reynolds, president. 

JViooern jDance 

One group of girls who will never have to apologize 
for their dancing is the Modern Dance Club. As a 
three-year-old Club, its record of performances is 
already impressive, but just this year has its skilled 
and polished work become known to the student body 
at large. 

For the Instructors' Club Christinas party and the 
Christmas Pageant for the fifth-hour assembly, the 
Modern Dance Club, together with the Glee Club and 
Choral Reading class, staged a classic Christmas 
program. 

The Dance Club this year attended two all-college 
dance symposiums where they danced in master's 
classes and were instructed by Ruth Bloomer of Con- 
necticut College and Sherry Underwood, a well-known 
dancer from New York. The dance group also per- 
formed on Visitor's Day outside in the college back- 
sard. In May. the group participated in an all-college 
dance concert with five other college dance groups. 




A ride in the subway, pantomime. 

Outing 

While the lazier element at Simmons has to resort 
to make-up, the Outing Club gals have that natural 
outdoor glow. From their sneakers to their wind- 
blown curls, they have that vim, vigor, and Wheaties 
look, and it is no wonder, for their calendar of activi- 
ties keeps them busy, athletically speaking, the year 
round. 

They go sailing at Marblehead, rock climbing at 
Rattlesnake Cliff in the Blue Hills, skiing on Mount 
Monadnock, and bike riding wherever the scenery 
suits their taste. They cook their own meals, have 
song fests, and come back on Sunday night with rosy 
cheeks and broken legs, ready to plan another trip. 

Once a month Simmons and MIT have their famous 
joint get-togethers where the Outing Club gals bring 
their guitars and favorite folk songs for an evening 
of vocalizing. 

However, all this physical exertion doesn't seem to 
scare members away from the Outing Club — indeed, 
this club is the second largest at Simmons. 

Cynthia Hardy, Peg Irish, Elizabeth Saffey 
and Phyllis Jones. 

Outing club officers consider their publicity 
campaign. 





Jean Morgan, Helen Curtin, Sylvia Tux- 
bury, President. 



I. V. C. F. 



In Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, Protestant students 
find an outlet for spiritual growth. An inter-denominational 
club, it helps to fill the religious gap in the education of 
college students. 

The Simmons chapter holds daily prayer meetings and 
sponsors a weekly Bible study, this year on the Gospel of 
Saint Mark. 

Monthly meetings of the Boston-area clubs provide an 
outstanding lecturer in the religious field, followed by a 
social, and a chance to get acquainted. In January, Doctor 
Alan A. MacRae, a well-known authority on the Old Testa- 
ment and president of the Faith Theological Seminary in 
Wilmington, Delaware, spoke on "Modern Views of the Old 
Testament." Twice a year Simmons takes part in an 
I. V. C. F. week-end conference with about nine other New 
England colleges. 

Lucky are the girls whom the club sends to Campus-in- 
the- Woods each summer. Here on a lake island in Canada 
about 120 members enjoy the combined advantages of a 
summer camp and training school. Three religious courses. 
plus boating, swimming, hiking, and all-round fun. add up 
to an experience they will never forget. 



Harriet Nelson, President, with the Vice- 
President, Ruth Redden, and Secretary- 
Treasurer, Esther Nystrom. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Simmons chapter of the YWCA is an organ- 
ization based on service work. The seventy-five 
girls who belong form into various committees to 
promote goodwill on the community level as well 
as in school. The "Y" started off the year with a 
bang-up party for the freshman class, and from this 
first activity they have worked to promote the com- 
muter and dorm relations within Simmons. In 

December the "Y" showed its Christmas spirit by 
caroling at the Home for the Aged in Roxbury and 
filling stockings at various settlement houses in the 
Boston area. 

At their monthly meetings, the ambitious "Y" 
members discuss the activities of the Student Chris- 
tian movement; they have speakers on such perti- 
nent questions as the food situation in Europe and 
the coordinating of religious groups. During 
"Brotherhood Week" this non-sectarian group 
sponsored a speaker at an open meeting. In March 
they presented a movie "I Am An Alcoholic" with 
a tea and discussion hour following. 

The active service committee of the "Y" volun- 
teered its services to Perkins Institute, where they 
read to the blind and entertained the children. The 
Public Affairs Committee works for the interest 
of religious groups; they meet with other Christian 
organizations and church groups and plan for the 
coordination of these groups. 

But "Y" is not all work. Throughout the year its 
members took advantage of the Boston YWCA to 
hold splash parties and cook dinner; they held 
dances with men's colleges, and in the spring they 
ended the year with an invitation of their new 
officers to the chapel of the "Y" and their annual 
banquet. 




ICC 



At Simmons we think of everything. We 
even have a club for clubs! It's called the 
ICC, which stands for the Inter-Club Council. 
The membership encompasses the veep of the 
Senior Class and the presidents of all clubs 
and classes in the college. In the meetings, 
the members try to solve all the major prob- 
lems which involve clubs as a whole. 

This organization also arranges all the de- 
tails for Pav Day — that frightful day when 
every business head in Simmon's pitches a 
booth in the hall and collects those dollar 
bills from your un-Sanforized pocketbook. 
ICC also sponsors the fifth-hour assembly on 
the Friday before Pay Day so that you will 
get some idea of what Cause those dollar bills 
will further. 

However. ICC does not operate only within 
the confines of Simmons. It put its executive 
brain power to work and sets up a committee 
which sends CARE packages abroad: these 
packages are sent through classes, through 
clubs, or through individuals, but ICC makes 
all the arrangements. 




Marian Tidmansen, President of ICC, with 
Harriet Nelson. 



Ridi 



nit 




Stock in the liniment firms must have gone up at 
least six points this past year, ever since the Simmons 
Riding Club has been in existence. For the girls who 
like to live dangerously, this club was organized to 
stimulate interest in horses and the art of riding. 

The Riding Club tries to give its members a full 
course in riding replete with films and lectures and 
actual practice. The) learn the different breeds, the 
characteristics of the various horses, and above all, 
they learn riding theory which they can put into use, 
if they wish, at the Wright Stables. 

However, besides these lectures and films, the Club 
entered two meets this year. The girls who partici- 
pated had to audition before they were allowed to enter 
the competition against nine other schools and colleges. 
Lasell. BL. Mt. Ida, and Radcliffe were among those 
participating, and in the May Riding Meet, the Sim- 
mons girls won twelve ribbons. 

With a meager beginning, the Club has been grow- 
ing steadily" and now has thirty members within its 
fold. These thirty brave girls, whose souls have been 
sorely tried, have done a terrific job in promoting 
the Tiding fever throughout the Simmons corridors. 



Nancy Speth, President, with Ann Herpy, 
Secretary. 



58 




Pajamas of any kind may be worn around the 
campus only if they are entirely concealed under 
a coat; they may never be worn in the dining 
room even if concealed. 



All permissions for absence from the College 
overnight during the week, that is, except Friday, 
Saturday and Sunday nights are granted by the 
Director. This includes, mid-week absences dur- 
ing examination periods and the night before a 
mid-week holiday. 



Students must refrain from talking in loud 
voices or shouting out of dormitory windows. 





No escorts are allowed on Campus grounds 
after 10:00 P. M. 




It s the tradition 



Simmons has an abundance of traditions for her stu- 
dents to enjoy, for her alumnae to remember. It all started 
in September when we timid freshmen arrived and were 
greeted by the Junior Welcoming Committee. We were 
already familiar with the work of this committee, for 
they had written to us, planned our Bible, assigned our 
Junior Sisters and in a sense made us feel right at home 
at Simmons before we even arrived. The next time we 
joined our sister class was at the Bib Party when we ran 
around the lunchroom collecting their autographs on our 
bibs. To show our impartiality, we were the sophomores'' 
guests at the Valentine Party. Then, when May came, 
we went from Junior's door to Junior's door at 5:30 ayem 
leaving quaint May Baskets and making enough noise to 
wake the patients in the BI. 

Pretty soon, we were sophomores. In this year we 
went to the Soph Luncheon and received our rings. Now 
we really felt a part of the Simmons scene. On May Day 
we ate strawberry shortcake with the seniors; this is 
probably the first time this year most of us were up for 
breakfast. 



Our class fakes over the steps. 




Stu-G royalty presides at Olde English 
Dinner. 



60 



at 



iimmons 



As juniors we were also kept busy with inter-class tra- 
ditions. The Junior Prom was our first dinner dance, 
although, of course, we had attended the formals of our 
first two years. Again, as in our freshman and sopho- 
more years, we joined in the all-college traditions like 
Christmas Formal and Stepsinging and Field Day. At 
the 'end of the year, many members of our class were eager 
to get a preview of what next year would bring so thev 
volunteered for Daisy Chain Committee and got a glimpse 
of Graduation. They rushed back and forth filling 
pillowcases with flowers that they later plaited on the 
lawn between North and South Halls and carried on 
Class Day. 

Finally the big year arrived. We became seniors, a 
tradition in itself. When we attained this highest strata. 
we went in for variety — from the rags and tags of the 
Hobo Party to the formality of Olde English Dinner. And 
then, at the end. there was Class Dav. On this dav of 
traditions, we held the garden party, the ivy planting, the 
Class Day Dance. These are the things we will remember 
long after the last exam is forgotten. 




Strictly the Ritz. 




The jester at Olde English amuses the girls 
at Mr. Rodes' expense. 



Kiddieland's most suave. 



61 




JDy bus, by car, 



Every commuter deserves ( for service 
beyond the call of duty) a gold star for 
timing. Whatever class hour begins 
[he average commuter's day, the minute 
before will find her running breathlessly 
into the front hall with a speed that 
would make Jesse Owens look twice. 

After she has caught her breath sit- 
ting through a few morning classes, the 
commuter bides her time in the various 
parts of the building. The grinds, bet- 
ter known as D.A.R.'s, are generally to 
be found on the fourth floor, and we 
don't mean reading a magazine. Not 
even the exhausting climb up to the 
library can daunt them. The majority 
of the less industrious souls join them 
only when exams or term-papers dead- 
lines approach. 



Black and blue may not be the colors 
of all Simmons students, but a certain 
group will show you their school colors 
proudly, and the) are definitely black 
and blue. How? Why? You try 
boarding a Huntington streetcar at 
berths one and two. left-hand track, 
Park Street subway station, between 
8:30 and 9 a.m. 

You wouldn't mind if the crowd had 
the good humor of most Filene's Base- 
ment stampedes, but it's every grouch 
for himself in the early morning rush 
to make the office or classroom on time. 




Catching up on those argyles and a little 
bit of bridge. 




The Lounge, commuters living room be- 
tween 8:45 and 4:10. 



62 



>y train, and plane: 




Where else but the Simmons cafeteria wi 
35c go so far? 



Deep in the bowels of the building. 

almost entirely obscured by a thick fog 
of smoke, are the rest. The ""Butt 
Room"' is anathema. That first awful 
whiff of smoke on opening the door is 
enough to send them scurrying to the 
restful recesses of the Lounge. Here, 
the deep-cushioned chairs and sofas are 
the main attraction, but if you're late, 
it's the floor for \ou. Here every prob- 
lem of our age is settled from haii 
styles and knitting, to the Marshall Plan 
and the Hydrogen Bomb. 



However, somewhere in their dim 
childhood, commuters got into the habit 
of eating. Slaves to habit are we all. so 
sometime between 11 and 1:30 nearlv 
every commuter ambles into the cafe- 
teria for a leisurely sandwich or two. 
This, at least, is one time when books 
and worries take a back seat, and those 
who always lose their tongues in class- 
room, miraculously find them. 

Four-ten, and by a miracle faster than 
jet-propulsion, they are off! They have 
to be or the S o'clock rush will make 
them feel like a corsage not-so-gentlv 
pressed in an unabridged Webster. Like 
to tell you more, but got to get to Park 
Street before quarter to five! 




Typical study group in the smoker. 




63 



A pack ol cards. 



a cui 




Harry always waits 



A gal can't sleep all the time . . . get up for 
breakfast, those soft-iboiled eggs and coffee . . . 
anyone going to first hour. . . . I'm rather short on 
quarters and wondered about some books . . . 
9:30 mail. . . . Maybe I should write some letters 
. . . any packages for me. Alice. . . . Whether to- 
dash through Emmanuel or honorably walk around. 
. . . The Prince girls with brown sack lunches take 
cabs to class . . . six times fifteen is ninety cents. . . . 
Meet you at three at Huey's. . . . Black please, and 
the third doughnut from the left. . . . Are you 
getting anything out of that course. ... A little 
bridge until dinner. . . . Find a fourth while I find 
fifty-two cards. . . . You either have the cards or 
you don't. . . . Shall we sneak in first dinner or 
wait for second. . . . What is it. . . . Sorry, no 
seconds on meat — more potatoes, though. . . . I'm 
starting a diet. . . . Anyone want my dessert. . . . 
Man called, no message. . . . Hey. going to five. . . . 



House meeting is always a good excuse for 
a smoke in East House living room. 



Dorm students pore intently over their 
books in North Hall smoker. 




64 



ol coIL 



ee 



an 



d lun lor all 



I've got one butt left. . . . Do you think Schuman's 
Marriage Test means anything. . . . How does one 
improve. . . . Not only is Dick Tracv married, 
but Superman, too. ... A single gal can't even 
read the comics without getting a complex. . . . 
Who's at the Savoy now. . . . And I'm shouting, 
shimmy like my Sister Kate. . . . What's going on 
around here. . . . Maybe I should knit arg\les. 
. . . I'm not that eager to work, so why not get 
married. . . . Do you think there are seventy per- 
cent at Simmons. . . . Just gotta read that book. 
. . . Summer reading hangover. . . . Wonder who 
called me. . . . Bzzz. . . . Telephone on two or 
four. . . . When. ... I'd love to. . . . Guess who 
called me. . . . You remember the friend of a 
friend of my brother. . . . Weld. . . . Say, how 
about some coffee at Gow's or would you rather say 
hello to Audrey. . . . Time to go to bed and I 
haven't started that shorthand. . . . No, a gal 
shouldn't study all the time, especially on weekends. 
. . . What are you doing tonight. . . . B School party 
I guess. . . . Wonder if that new black dress is 
sexy enough. . . . What do you think. . . . He'll 
be there. . . . I'm not ready. . . . Which do you 
like better . . . my pearls or your gold earrings. 
. . You have a oaller. ... Be right 

You look wonderful, so have a real 
. . And if there are any extra men 

. Sure thing. . . . See you in the 
smoker when you get in. . . . Wonder how that 
movie at the Kenmore is. . . . Hey, someone look- 
ins for a blind date. . . . How tall is he. . . . 



. . . Bzzz 

down. . . 
nice time 
around. . 





Gow's is where our money goes. 



Hot chocolate never tasted better. 



c 



amp us is t 



he _LiIe 




Campus carolers croon for the camera. 



Hey, can anybody lend me a dime? 



Well, -ure I'll go. . . . 305 Brookline Avenue. . . . 
Cars. cabs, couples. . . . Where's my lipstick . . . 
v\hat lime is it. . . . Had a wonderful time. . . . 
\nd let me know if \ou find that earring. . . . Nite. 
... Hi Harry. . . . Phew! Just made it. . . . And 
where have you been tonight, young lady. . . . 
What's mv name. . . . R's must be here some- 
where. . . . 1:30. . . . There. . . . Ilev. going to 
five. . . . Where did vou go tonight. . . . What a 
drab character he turned out to be. . . . But he 
had the cutest friend. . . . C'mon down to my 
room. . . . Nite. Harrv. 




Sunday night supper — back to reality. 




66 





Meet you at the drug after 9th. 



"But when Irish eyes are smiling . . .' 



House seniors listen to Ann-Marie Johnson 
play during a free moment. 




m 



frfr S* ** '*^-- ■ 




ir 






:^» 




I 




v 



% 







Us? *^M^ *2a^ fern* r M F r mZ* 




Al obody . . . nobody but . . . nobody but 







WW* 




» . 






►iminoii5 girls 



1, 








"■ AliffiRlCAN 

HGI 





USIKESS 





We like to see our "kiddies" having a good 
time. 




The planting of the green, May Day 
morning. 



It's tl 



ie custom 




Simmons Pops, too. 



There'll be strawberry shortcake fit for a 
king. 




oftl 



ie cam 13 us 



The Bancroft family: Natty Daddy, Mommy 
Tommy and Peggy Jr. 




The Nativity scene re-enacted at the 
Christmas pageant. 





The Seniors — dem bums. 



Daisy Chain escorts the seniors. 




WHO WE ARE 



We are the student body and the 
future alumnae. Some day we might 
discover a drug, write a best seller, or 
something. Meanwhile, true to John 
Simmons' intentions, we can earn our 
livings — by taking I 20 words a minute, 
or planning balanced meals, or cata- 
loguing books, or something. Maybe 
we shan't even be earning our own 
livings; maybe we'll be encouraging 
someone else to better earn his. Per- 
haps we'll pursue a double career — at 
home and at work; perhaps we'll con- 
fine ourselves to one or the other — at 
work we'll prove ourselves, at home 
we'il prove the value of the security 
our education has given us, Whatever 
we do, we know we have the con- 
fidence of training and ability to do as 
we choose. 



H 




X resh 



man, 



XTere, ±\\ 



ere, 



Freshman year at Simmons is really only 
one long orientation period; everything is 
new and unfamiliar, an adventure in living 
as well as learning. The first week of a 
freshman, the official orientation period, 
exposes her to a bombardment of place- 
ment tests and talks and teas and a physical 
examination as gruelling as the Inquisi- 
tion. After that she's launched into her 
classes; and for the rest of both semesters 
she'll probably spend hours in Library C, 
reading Soc. If she's a dorm student, she 
lives an insular life in one of the group of 
rambling Victorian houses that comprise 
Freshman Campus in Brookline and walks 
a mile to school each day. First semester 
there will teach her (after she's forgotten 
once or twice) when to sign out, how to 
sneak in on first shift at dinner, how to 
play bridge and consequently ignore 
studies. She'll probably succumb to the 
tobacco habit in order to appear more 
sophisticated. This process of sophistica- 
tion is usually shed for dorm pranks and 
bull-sessions — however, and what fresh- 
man ever had a blase attitude toward food? 
She becomes reconciled to life without a 
radio and ten o'clock week night curfew. 



Sue Mathews, Sally Jordan, Mary Harrigan, 
Joan Nicolli. 



This won't last forever. 



Relaxation before dinner at 36. 




an 



J E 



vervwnere 



T 



Early on May Day morning, the freshman 
dashes to the Brookline Avenue Campus, 
tiptoes through sleeping dorms, and leaves 
tiny May Basket for her junior sister. Back 
at 36 Francis Street she eats all the straw- 
berry shortcake humanly advisable while 
her older sisters dance around a May Pole 
on the green behind Evans Hall. In school 
she becomes accustomed to being addressed 
as "Miss — " in class and loses some of her 
awe for professors. After the ordeal of 
midyear examinations, the freshman starts 
thinking seriously about her major and is 
guided by the College Op lectures. Usually 
this is decided without too much difficulty, 
and when June finally rolls around, the 
typical freshman has accumulated a store 
of experience and some knowledge. The 
novelty of college classes and college life 
has vanished; the freshman knows her way 
around and is wise in the ways of upper- 
classmen. She will probably remember 
her first year as one of the best. 




Freshmen discuss registra- 
tion technique with Mrs. 
Gonyea during orienta- 
tion week. 



Freshmen find table con- 
versation aids digestion. 



Time out for relaxation on 
Freshman campus. 







President Mary Luce pins a May Day 
corsage on the newly elected Freshman 
President Carolyn Sonniksen. 



1 lie oophomores Acquire a 




Lives there a sophomore with brain so dull 
that she doesn't know the answer to every- 
thing? Self-assurance is the common de- 
nominator for almost all sophomores; after 
all, hasn't she been exposed to culture and 
swallowed it in one gulp. After one course 
in psych she glibly discusses life in terms of 
psychoses and neurosis, frustration and Freud. 
After a course in Ec, she has mastered the 
intricacies of world finance and can dismiss 
Karl Marx with a wave of the hand. Dr. 
Janney's lectures on sex are old hat . . . ( they 
went freshman year). But eventually the 
sophomore undergoes an awakening and 
begins to doubt her own omniscience . . . 
( This occurs after midyears ) . Then she settles 
down to behaving like the rest of the upper- 
classmen who frankly admit that they're in a 
fog. If she's a dorm student, the sophomore 
moves up to upperclass campus where she 
usually lives in a triple, enjoys the privilege 
of smoking 'till 1:30, staying out later, and 
cutting more classes than she did as a fresh- 
man. Soph Shuffle becomes a social must which 
gives her an opportunity to better her rela- 
tionship with the male population of Boston 
and vicinity. She no longer has gym classes 
and looks askance at the freshman apparelled 
according to Wright and Ditson's haut cou- 
ture. Usually, a sophomore has begun her 
major according to her whim. She may have 
a tendency to let her studies slide and later 
crams like mad. She queries juniors about 
"snap" courses and plans to take them rather 
than the ten hour course she may have reck- 
lessly contemplated at one time. Eventually, 
the sophomore's erratic behavior and ideas 
subside and she becomes a wee bit wiser and 
far more normal. 



The North Hall Sophomores relax en masse 
by reading the list of movies in the 
Herald and talking over school affairs. 



82 



x Jace m the O 



mi 






President Sonniksen listens to suggestions 
from the class officers, Rita Sue King, 
Joan Conley, Janet Driver, Carolyn Son- 
niksen, Dotty Hesse, Ginny Ferguson, and 
Phyllis Jones. 



Time out for a cjp of coffee is taken by 
Jeanne MacDonald, Lucille LeVee, Caro- 
lyn Sonniksen, and Treva Knight. 



I 



After dinner in South Hall means singing 
around the piano and bridge playing 
with demi-tasse on certain evenings. 





J 



unior jl artners 111 



In white dresses, the Junior Welcome Com- 
mittee inaugurates its "next to the last year" 
by guiding the bewildered freshmen through 
orientation week. As sisters to the freshmen 
class, they look forward to such enjoyable 
events as a good dinner and an evening at the 
theatre. Early in October, they give their 
sister class a Bib Party which is highlighted 
by a signature race. The Junior Prom be- 
comes an event of the year to which fiances as 
well as casual acquaintances and blind dates 
are invited well in advance. At last 1:30 per- 
missions are a reality and there is no need for 
racing to 305 Brookline Avenue for the mid- 
night curfew if all the late permission privi- 
leges have been used. Such upperclass activ- 
ities as participating in the Daisy Chain on 
Class Day and ushering at Baccalaureate and 
Commencement exercises are realized and the 



The Junior Welcome Committee 
which makes the first Freshmen 
days friendly ones. 



May Breakfast dancers find time 
for strawberry shortcake, too. 



Juniors look on during step singing 
ceremony at the Colonnade. 



lor ± i 



omotion 



juniors find themselves imagining their own 
graduation. Inhabitants of South Hall can be 
found most of the day and night in the base- 
ment smoker. The laundry room becomes the 
greatest asset and Miss Chrysler's pre- 
Christmas vacation demi-tasse affairs are a 
tradition long to be remembered. Lack of 
finances brings about frequent visits to Miss 
Day's baby-sitting service office where, for 
the first time, red check marks are greatly 
anticipated. After midyears, the fifth-year 
nurses bid farewell and launch on a two- 
year hospital training course which leaves 
them little time or energy for recreation. The 
Junior Year becomes a culmination of upper- 
class permissions, and devotion and hard work 
in the major. Graduation is the goal that is 
at last in sight. 



Class officers — '51 

Eleanor Tarasewich, Jane Sid- 
ford, Bobbie Schuette, Elizabeth 
Kudriavetz, Louise Buck. 

Time out for a cigarette on the 
Colonnade. 



Appleton shouts hello. 






1950 



xlasl 



Excuse us! Yes, we wonder if the rest of the school will excuse us if we digress for 
one page to give some flashes into the history of our class — 1-9-5-0. The rest of the 
yearbook will be devoted to you and us, but now let the seniors have the floor. 

Four. Four years. Four years of college. It sounds better and better as we go 
along; and so it was. Nineteen fifty went to college at an exciting time. Vets returning 
under the GI Bill and flooding the coed and men's schools. . . . Simmons raised tuition 
1(^S just before we came ... in our honor, no doubt . . . cab tour of Boston at our expense 

. . . first impression of roomie, "One year with that!" . . . first impression of college, 
"Where's the lake?" . . . first impression of food, "All these potatoes and no meat" . . . 
six whole meatless weeks taxed dietitian's ingenuity as well as our stomachs . . . 
creamed eggs . . . P.A.'s at C.C. . . . running from Beacon to Francis in stocking feet to 
beat the curfew . . . first cigarette . . . first taste for coffee . . . "Say Harvard Yard" 
. . . mass production for answers to Social Studies exam . . . Northeastern men ... to 
commuters, almost a continuation of high school. 

Another raise in tuition . . . exodus to ujjper-class campus . . . now sophs and very 
much impressed with our broadened outlook . . . soon found that we were no different 
from any other sophomore class as far apathy goes . . . sophomore slump set in. . . . 
Lost: two andirons from Evans Living Boom, finder please cart back, no questions 
asked. . . . Watch and Ward Society censors shocking painting in South. . . . See historic 
Boston from North Hall windows . . . why, the snow is so high we can't see across the 
street . . . college closed one day . . . commuters wonder if a higher education is worth 
all this, but meanwhile the dog sled service between Park and Buggies seems fairly 
satisfactory. . . . Northeastern and Harvard men. . . . Spring comes with new crop of 
daffodils and peeping Toms. 

Another raise in room and board . . . the price of living goes up, my daddy's wages 
go down . . . what a way to start junior year ... in the mornin' . . . but Huey's and 
Gow's get all our dough . . . toast the English . . . soap box year ... he hasn't a chance 
. . . Bepublican, Democratic, Progressive . . . everyone becomes civicalby responsible 
. . . papers, exams forgotten while lights blaze and radios blare all night long . . . the 
second Tuesday after the first Monday . . . Boper, Gallup, and Dewey beaten by Harry 
the Haberdasher . . . lots of glum faces . . . everyone's doing it. Doing what? Switch- 
ing schools . . . more fun than a five honor count . . . from Prepro to a more practical 
school . . . from the practical schools to Prepro . . . year of protests . . . little revolts 
spring up in every classroom in regard to curriculum and then adjusted . . . stealing 
in South . . . sign in. sign out, sign in. sign out. . . . Can't take out a cig without being 
suspected of harboring a gun . . . Oh well, we have l:30's every single night . . . who 
studies now? . . . but in Evans, remember, keep both feet on the floor . . . Good Humor 
Man, where are you? . . . passing out ice cream while holding his own form of refresh- 
ment . . . Bussian Bank ... an incongruous name, an incongruous game . . . joy over 
Summer Beading List . . . Northeastern, Harvard, and M.I.T. . . . where's the snow? . . . 
many a skier's heart broken instead of a limb . . . commuters keep coming and going. 

Please open your hearts and your purses . . . and yet another — raise in tuition, 
that is . . . but the food isn't any better ... I like stew because I'm dead broke . . . 
senior year . . . our last year . . . job? that elusive term . . . where ya going for field 
work? . . . after graduation what? . . . senior year . . . yet to crack a book . . . remem- 
ber those corsage box parties . . . oh, those small houses ... in the Halls restrictions, 
restrictions . . . Evans Hall . . . heat without banging . . . elevator without service . . . 
the fifth floor is my temptation, I shall not want cigs . . . fourth for two hands . . . 
Canasta and Oke . . . kiss the profs good-bye . . . out to apply the theoretical to the 
practical . . . onward and upward . . . Excelsior! 



Most Capable 
Shirley Neizer 





Most Original 
Lois Magoon 




Most Likely to Succeed 
June Murray 





Most Attractive 
Anne Schuman 



Best Natured 

Marjorie Feldman 



Jenior JVlost' 




Most Talkative 
Polly Hagen 




Best All Around 
Pat Kihn 



Most Energetic 

Ginger Bown 



Most Efficient 
Dot Rose 






Wittiest 
Babe Russell 



87 



aSlhnt* ■nsat 




Our own Hollywood and Vine 



88 




Due to circumstances beyond the control of the Yearbook Staff, the 
Senior Section is hereby submitted in two parts. 

The Editor 



89 




FREDA ALEXANDER 

Freddy 

English. 12 Malcolm Road, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts 

Transferred from Lasell Junior College 3; 
English 2, 3; Dramatic 3, 4. 
Her haircuts! 



MARJORIE GERTRUDE ANASTASIA 
Marge 

Science. 106 Cottage Avenue, Winthrop, 
Massachusetts 

Outing 1, 2, 3; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Ellen Rich- 
ards 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom 3; Olde English 
Dinner 4. 

"See vou in organic lab!" 



MERT1E EMERY ANGELL 
Home Economics. 40 West Main Street, 
Millbury, Massachusetts 

Home Ec 2, 3, 4; House Senior 4; YWCA 1; 

Hobo Party 4; Junior Jamboree 3. 
The four o'clock rush. 

VERONICA ARAX ASLANIAN 
Vee 

Science. 153 Lexington Avenue, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts 

Transferred from Lasell Junior College 2; 
Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 3; 

Glee Club 2; Outing 2. 
Lab-coat — frog's best friend. 



CARMEN HOWARD AZAROFF (MRS.) 
Carm 

Business. 800 Beacon Street, Boston, 
Massachusetts 



NATALIE SALLINE BANCROFT 

I\al 

Prince. 71 Sherman Street, Portland, 
Maine 

Outing 1, 2; YWCA 1; Prince 3, 4; Senior 
Luncheon 4; May Breakfast 3; Olde Eng- 
lish Dinner 4; Baccalaureate 3. 

Portland's own Sarah Vaughn ! 




90 




ALICE VIRGINIA BARBALIAN 
English. 231 College Street, Springfield 
9, Massachusetts 



MARTHA KATHERINE BARBER 

Marty 

Science. 365 Baker Street, West Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts 



_jf.J 



DALE BARRACLOUGH 
English. 31 Plymouth Road, Needham 
92, Massachusetts 



FRANCES ARNELIA BARROW 

Frannie 

English. 181 Brown Street, Waltham, 

Massachusetts 
Good company. 

MARIE BARROW 

Pete 

Business. 170 West Newton Street, Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts 

Modern Dance 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Impish smile and gleaming eyes. 

VERA PHYLLIS BELL 
Phyl 

English. 122 Clifton Avenue, Marble- 
head, Massachusetts 

News 1, Associate Managing Editor 2, 3, Man- 
aging Editor 4; Le Cercle Francais 1, 2, 3, 
Treasurer 2; Junior Prom 3; Junior Jam- 
boree 3; Junior Welcome Committee 3; 
English 1, 2, Vice-President 3; Outing 4; 
Daisy Chain 3; President's Reception 3; 
Commencement 3; Transfer Committee 4; 
Baccalaureate 3. 

Square dances . . . New Hampshire . . . 
Newspapers. 




91 



JANET AUSTIN BENTLEY (MRS.) 
Business. 53 Raleigh Road, Belmont 78, 
Massachusetts 



KATHRYN THERESA BERNARD 
KayT 

Prince. 227 High Street, Newburyport, 
Massachusetts 

Stu-G Social Activily Chairman 4; House 
Chairman 3; Dorm CouncT 3; Bridge 
Tournament Chairman 3; NSA 2, 3; Chair- 
man Foreign Student Orientation 3. 

"It's the GREATEST!" 



BETTY DEBORAH BLOOM 
English. 1405 Blue Hill Avenue, Matta- 
pan, Massachusetts 

Academy 3, 4; English 2, 3, Vice-President 4; 
Hillel 1, 2, 3. Publicity Chairman 4; NSA 3. 
"Freddys ready, ready Betty?" 



ALICE LEILA BLUE 
Bluey 

Preprofessional. 23 Buena Vista Park, 
Cambridge 40, Massachusetts 

Outing 1, 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1, 2. 
A walking sunshine tablet. 






•"Sip-,. 









VIRGINIA LEE BOWN 
Ginger Bones 

English. 800 West Ferry Street, Buffalo, 
New York 

Transferred from Pine Manor Junior Col- 
lege 3; 

Mic Editor 4; News Assistant Technical Edi- 
tor 3; NSA Chairman New England Tour 
3; Review 4; Christian Science 3, 4; Eng- 
lish 3. 

"B-O-W-N. Brown without the R!" 



ELIZABETH BEHRSIN BOYDEN 

(MRS.) 
Betty 
Home Economics. 807 East Street, Wal- 

pole, Massachusetts 

Home Ec 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1. 
Thanksgiving 1949. 



92 



JOAN ELIZABETH BRADLEY 

Brad 

Business. 27 Greenway Street, Hamden, 
Connecticut 

Glee Club 1; May Breakfast 3; Bib Party 3; 
News Business Manager 4; Olde English 
Dinner 3, 4; Scribnnal 3, 4; Transfer Com- 
mittee 3; YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4. 

"Do I ever get involved!'' 

JEANNE MARILYN BRANAGHAN 
Prince. 29 Peasant Street, Attleboro 
Massachusetts 

Outing 1; Newman 1, 2, 3; Spanish 1; Prince 
Club Secretary 3, President 4; Pan Ameri- 
can 1; Junior Welcome Committee; House 
Senior 4; Class Day Committee 4; Daisy 
Chain 3. 

Always a ready smile. 

ANNE-MARIE BRONLUND 
Br unity 

Nursing. 43 Beverly Street, Pittsfield, 
Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; Outing 1, 2; YWCA 1, 2. 



BABBARA AITKEN BROWN 
Barb 

English. 170 Prospect Street, Leomin- 
ster, Massachusetts 

Fund Drive 4; Mic Circulation Manager 4; 
News Circulation Manager 1, 2, 3; News 
Dance 2; Student Helper 2, 3. 

Dimples which sparkle. 





ELIZABETH ANN BRYAN 
Betty 

English. 1744 Hartshorn Road, East 
Cleveland, Ohio 



MARGARET ELIZABETH BUDDY 
Bird 

Prince. 454 Glen Street, Glen Falls, New 
York 

Transferred from Harcum Junior College; 

Prince. 
"Get Sam out of mv closet." 



93 



MARY EILEEN BURKE 
Science. 37 Hill Street, New Bedford, 
Massachusetts 

Curriculum Committee 3; English 1; New- 
man 2, 3, 4. 
Laughs, labs, late hours. 



ELAINE BERNICE CHAUVIN 
Home Economics. 14 Fifth Avenue, 
Webster, Massachusetts 

Glee Club 1, 4; Pinafore 3; Home Ec 2, 3, 
4, Program Chairman 4; Executive Board 
4; Junior Welcome Committee. 

"Dancing, why natch!!!" 





HELEN ANNE CICHONOWICZ 
Nursing. 42 Valley Street, Springfield, 
Vermont 



JOAN MARIE CLASBY 
Nursing. 175 Walnut Street, Brookline, 
Massachusetts 

Anne Strong; Newman, Program Chairman 2, 
3, Vice-President 2; Outing 1, 2, 3, Pro- 
gram Chairman 2: Junior Welcome Com- 
mittee; May Day. 

"Little one." 



MARY LOUISE CLEAVE 
Prince. 909 Hay ward Avenue, Bremer- 
ton, Washington 
A willing helper. 



MARY OLIVIA CLIFFORD 
Home Economics. 20 Kirk Street, West 
Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Home Ec 2, 3, 4, Vice-President 4; Honor 

Board 3. 
That fabulous white gown! 



DOROTHY ELAINE COHEN 
Dotty 

Preprofessional. 20 Alton Place, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts 

Academy 3, 4; Hillel 2, 3, 4. 
Waterloo Bridge. 



SUZANNE FRANCES CONLEY 
Sue 

Prince. 126 Brockton Street, Brockton, 
Massachusetts 

Transferred from Mt. Holyoke 3; Hobo Party 
Chairman 4; Newman; Prince; House 
Chairman; Transfer Committee; Dorm 
board. 

"Jingo." 








f) 



MARY ELIZABETH CORCORAN 
Business. 613 Heath Street, Brookline, 
Massachusetts 

Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan American 3; Scrib- 

unal 3, 4. 
Peppy little redhead. 



BLANCHE THERESE COUTURE 

Terry 

Nursing. 302 Central Street, Central 
Falls, Rhode Island 

Le Circle Francais. 
Mad about Chopin. 



MARY LOUISE CREELEY 

English. 130 Newbury Street, Melrose, 
Massachusetts 

Daisy Chain 3; Newman 4; Mic Formal 3; 

Review 3, 4; YWCA 3, 4. 
Serious but sweet. 



HELEN FRANCES CURTIN 
Lenny 

Library Science. 27 Glendale Avenue, 
Everett, Massachusetts 

Glee Club 1; Pan American 1, 2; YWCA 3, 

4; Treasurer 4; 020 3, 4; Secretary 4. 
Courage of her convictions. 



■HnHH 



95 




CATHERINE MAE CURTISS 

Cathie 

Business. 47 Wendell Street, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts 

Newman 1; Scribunal 4. 
"Have a letter to mail." 



KATHERINE JOYCE DAKOS 

Kay 

Preprofessional. 122 Mt. Washington 

Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
Hard to wake up. 



SALLY COOLIDGE DAVENPORT 

Sal 

Home Economics. 106 Lewis Avenue, 
Walpole, Massachusetts 

Bluettes 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Treasurer 1; Dorm 
Board 3; Dorm Council 3; Home Ec 4; 
Honor Board 4; House Chairman 3; House 
Senior 4; Junior Prom 3. 

"For Boston, For Boston." 

MARY GERTRUDE DEE 
Business. 39 Hurlcroft Road, Milton, 
Massachusetts 

Curriculum Committee Chairman 4; Newman 
1, 3; Scribunal 2, 3, 4; Stu-G 4; Com- 
muter Representative 4. 

Sweet and lovely. 



CAROL SUE DIAMOND 
Prince. 340 Radel Terrace, South 
Orange, New Jersey 

Hillel 1, 2; Outing 2; PCA 2; Prince 3; 
Hobo Party 4; Senior Prom 4; Mic 4. 



ELDA CONCETTA DI IANNI 
Business. 46 Morton Avenue, Medford, 
Massachusetts 

Compets 1, 2, 3, Director 4; Dramatic 1, 2, 3, 
4; Newman 1; Pan American 2, 3; Stu- 
dent Representative 4. 

Hands, eyes, figure, accent, intelligence. 





96 




ELIZABETH LANG DONOVAN 
Muff 

Business. 19 Wannalancit Street, Lowell, 
Massachusetts 

Bookstore Committee; Junior Prom 3; New- 
man 1, 2, 4; Okie English Dinner 4; Out- 
ing 1; Pan American I; Scribunal 2, 4. 

Suits those suits. 



DOROTHY ELIZABETH DOOLEY 
Dot 

Business. 285 Harvard Street, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts 

Scribunal; Export Study Group. 
"I can't find it!!!" 

MADELINE CLARE DORMAN 
Maddie 

Business. 64 Preston Street, Everett, 
Massachusetts 

Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan American 2; Scribu- 
nal 1, 3, 4; YWCA 2. 



MYRTLE CHRISTIANA DOWNING 

Myrl 

Home Economics. West Campton, New- 
Hampshire 

Home Ec 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan American 1. 
Situation well in hand. 



NORMA RUTH DUNCAN 

Nursing. 160 Bradford Street, Everett, 
Massachusetts 



JOAN OLIVE DuPLESSIS 
Jo 

Home Economics. 37 Lynn Shore Drive, 
Lynn, Massachusetts 

Dramatic 3; Home Ec 3, 4. Food Chairman 4; 

Newman 3, 4; Olde English Dinner 3. 
That artistic touch. 




97 




MARILYN DUTTON 

Business. 26 York Terrace, Melrose, 
Massachusetts 

Junior Jamboree 3; Junior Welcome Com- 
mittee; Le Cercle Francais 1, 2; Mimeo- 
graph Committee 4; Scribunal 2, 3, 4; 
Program Committee 3; YWCA Z, 2, 3. 



V. JANE ELZENBECK (MRS.) 
Science. 89 Nelson Avenue, Saratoga 
Springs, New York 

Ellen Richards 3, 4. 



NANCY ERSHLER 
Ersh 

Library Science. 603 Delaware Avenue, 
Erie, Pennsylvania 

Hillel 1, 2; Mic 4; AW 1; Outing 1; PCA 

2, 3; 0-20 4. 
Say something funny, Ersh! 

LOIS JEANNE ERWIN 
Loie 

Library Science. 37 Woolnough Avenue, 
Battle Creek, Michigan 

Transferred from University of Michigan; 

Dramatic 2; Outing 2, 3, 4; YWCA 4; 

0-20 2, 3, 4. 
Square dances, Laulotans, and food. 



DOROTHY ANNE FAHEY 
Dot 

Preprofessional. 21 Victoria Street, Low- 
ell, Massachusetts 

Daisy Chain 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Graduation 
Choir 1, 2, 3; Newman 1, 2, 3. 4; Olde 
English Dinner 3; Outing 1; Presidents 
Reception 3; Spanish 1; Senior Luncheon 
2; Volunteer Service Organization 3. 

"Where's Peg, it's cheese souffle." 



HELENA EUNICE FARREN 
Home Economics. 41 Newhall Street, 
Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Home Ec 2, 3, 4; Luncheon Committee 3, 4; 

Newman 1, 2, 3. 
Matinee with Bob and Ray. 




98 



ELINOR MAXINE FEINBERG 

Ellie 

Business. 58 Johnston Road, Dorchester, 
Massachusetts 

Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; IZFA 3, 4; Junior Welcome 

Committee; Scribunal 2, 3. 
Sincerity and frankness. 



MARJORIE FELDMAN 

Mef 

Science. 409 Fountain Street, New 
Haven, Connecticut 

Ellen Richards 1, 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4. 
"I'm only kidding." 



MARY VIRGINIA FISH 
Business. 55 Hilburn Street, Roslindalc. 
Massachusetts 

Newman ]. 2, 3, 4; Scribunal 2, 3, 4. 



BEVERLY ANN FOSS 
Bet; 

Preprofessional. 7 Chilton Road, Brock- 
ton, Massachusetts 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Commencement 3; 

IVCF 4; Riding 3, 4. 
Amiable. 






i~ . 



BEVERLY NINA FOSS 
Bev 

Library Science. 24 Maitland Street, Mil- 
ton, Massachusetts 

Academy 3, 4; Curriculum Committee 3, 4; 

Outing 2; Transfer Committee 4; 0-20 4. 
Talking, laughing. 



ELSIE FRABOTTA 
Els 

English. Main Street, North Uxbridge, 
Massachusetts 

English 2; Mic, Associate Editor 4; News, 

Technical Editor 2, 3; Review 4. 
"Io son felice." 



99 



GERALDINE LOUISE GAETZ 

Gerry 

Home Economics. Laurel Heights, Shel- 
ton, Connecticut 

Home Ec 2, 3, 4; Class Treasurer 2; Class 

President 3. 
Blushing beauty with terrific appetite. 



SHIRLEY ELIZABETH GARNER 
Butch 

Prince. 55 Florence Avenue, Norwood, 
Massachusetts 

Glee Club, President 4; Dramatic 1, 2, 3; 
YWCA 1; Transfer Committee; Junior 
Welcome Committee; Curriculum Com- 
mittee; Prince; Mic 2. 









ESTHER LORRAINE GLAZER 

Dutchess 

Business. 10 Walnut Road, Somerviile, 
Massachusetts 

Hillel 1, Social Chairman 2, Vice-President 3, 
President 4; IZFA 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 1; 
Scribunal 3. 



PATRICIA ELLEN GLEASON 
Pat 

Prince. 751 West Douglas Street, Jack- 
sonville, Illinois 

Transferred from Rosary College; Prince; 

Newman; Senior Executive Board; Hobo 

Party. 
"My last husband — Sam." 



ELAINE RUTH GOLDMAN 

Goldie 

Science. 1007% North Madison Street, 
Rome, New York 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Daisy Chain 3; Hillel 
1, 2, 3; IZFA 1; Outing 1; Pan American 1. 
Argyles and mystery stories. 



MYRNA RUTH GOLDSTEIN 
Mym 

Prince. 308 Church Street, North Adams, 
Massachusetts 

Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Dramatic 1, 2; Prince 3, 4; 

Fire Chief 4. 
That light in her eves. 



100 




ROSAMOND WENTWORTH GOULD 
Nursing. ]21 Federal Street, Salem, 
Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; Dramatic 1; Outing 1. 
Constant blush. 



JOANNA GREENE 
Jo 

Preprofessional. 130 Marsh Street, Bel- 
mont, Massachusetts 

Dramatic 3, 4; Forum, Vice-President 3, 

President 4-; Soph Luncheon 2. 
Skiing is best. 



ELIZABETH MAY GRIFFITHS 

Science. 115 Sherwood Road, Medford, 
Massachusetts 

Transferred from Colby College. 



PAULINE CLARK HAGAN 
Polly 

Business. 105 Plymouth Street, Strat- 
ford, Connecticut 

Dramatic 1; Junior Jamboree 3; Scribunal 2, 

3, 4; YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2. 
Vim, vigor, and vitality. 



CAROLYN IRENE HAHN 
Lyn 

Home Economics. 8 Park End Place, 
Forest Hills, New York 

Bib Party Co-Chairman 3; Glee Club 1; Home 
Ec 2, 3, 4; Pan American 1; Stu-G Assist- 
ant Vice-President 4; YWCA 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
President 3. 

Yum — food. 



ELIZABETH ALICE HALL 
Betty 

Business. 121 Main Street, Yarmouth, 
Maine 

Bib Party 3; Class President 4; College Events 
Committee 3; Curriculum Committee 3; 
Junior Jamboree Chairman 3; Scribunal 
2, 3; YWCA 2. 

President Truman's piano playing rival. 




101 





MARGO HAPP 
Kitty 

Business. 126 West Main Street, Port 
Jerris, New York 

Dramatics 1; Modern Dance 2; Mic 4. 
A girl who has Ayres. 



BARBARA ELIZABETH HASKELL 
Barby 

Nursing. 258 Salmon Street, Manchester, 
New Hampshire 

Anne Strong 2, 3; Orchestra 1, 2, 3, President 

3, Pianist. 
C-sharp or B-flat? 



ELEANOR HAZEN 

Nursing. Jewett Street, Georgetown, 
Massachusetts 



ANN MARIE HEELEY 

Nursing. 87 Otis Street, Medford, Massa- 
chusetts 



ELAINE HARRIET HELMAN 
Science. 1 Howland Street, Roxbury, 
Massachusetts 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; English 2, 3; Hillel 

1, 2, 3; Outing 2. 
"See you in organic lab." 



JEAN BURTON HIRSH 
English. Gray Lodge, Pikesville, Mary- 
land 

Christmas Pageant Chairman 4; Compets 1, 
3; Drama 1, 2, 3, 4; Fund Drive Chairman 
4; Honor Board 1; News 1, 2, 3, 4, News 
Formal Chairman; Spring Production 3; 
Soph Luncheon 2. 

One diamond — bid and made. 




102 




DOROTHY HELEN HOLMES 

Dolly 

Library Science. 

News 1, 2; Special Writer 2; Representative 
to Executive Board 2; Town Hall Chair- 
man 3; YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4; 0-20 2, 3, 4. 

Sypher fan, jokes, turtles, hiccoughs. 

JEANNE LOUISE HOWELL 

1061 Rosalie Avenue, Lakewood, Ohio 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Librarian 2; Secretary 3; 

Home Economics 2, 3, 4; Junior Welcome 

Committee, Entertainment Chairman 3; 

Olde English Dinner 3; Senior Luncheon 

2; YWCA 2, 3. 
Can't call those things! 



ELIZABETH ELEANOR HUMPHREY 

Liz 

Home Economics. 520 Ash Street, Win- 
netka, Illinois 

Home Ec 2, 3, 4; Transfer Committee 4. 
Early to Bed, Late to Rise! 

MARGARET IRISH 

Peg 

English. Church Street, Turner, Maine 

Assistant House Fire Chief 3; Daisy Chain 3; 
English 1, 2, 3; Curriculum Committee 3; 
Outing 1, 2, 3, 4, Ski-representative 3, 
President 4; YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Rep- 
resentative to College Events Committee; 
News 3, 4. 

Fabulous! Life's but an Outing! 



HELEN JACOBS 
Prince. 21 Russe! 
Massachusetts 

Hillel Class Representative 



Street, Brooklinc, 



RUTH JENKINS 

Library Science. 11 Steele Street, Stone- 
ham, Massachusetts 

Glee Club 1; Pan American 1, 2, 3; 020 

2, 3, 4. 
Fun, food, and friends. 




103 



SEVA JOHN JOAKIM 

Sivy 

Business. 46 Louis Street, Hyaimis, 
Massachusetts 

Curriculum Committee 3; Orthodox 1, 2, 3, 

4, President 4. 
Two-day diets. 

ANN-MARIE ELIZABETH JOHNSON 
A.M. 

Business. 190 South Quinsigamond Ave- 
nue, Shrewsbury, Massachusetts 

. Class Secretary 4; Dorm Board 3; Dorm 
Council 3; Freshman Prom Committee 1; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; House. Senior; Nurs- 
ing Party Chairman 3; Scribunal 2, 3, 4; 
Soph Shuffle Committee 2; YWCA 1, 2; 
Dramatic 1, 2. 
Music, music, and more music. 

JOANNE JOHNSON 
Jo 

Business. 460 Central Avenue, Milton, 
Massachusetts 

Outing 2; Executive Board 4; Scribunal 3, 4. 
Still and deep. 

E. FRANCES KATEN 

Snooks 

English. 255 Adams Street, Milton, Mas- 
sachusetts 

Curriculum Committee 3; Executive Commit- 
tee 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Dramatic 3; 
Compets 3; News 1, 2. 

Career woman. 



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MARGARET MARY KEARNS 
Peg 

Science. 47 West Walnut Park, Roxbury, 
Massachusetts 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Wanted: 8-day week. 



MARJORIE FULLER KEITH 

Mnree 

English. 3 Oak Terrace, Newton High- 
lands, Massachusetts 

Caps and Gowns, Co-Chairman 4. 



104 



MARGARET MARY KELLEY 

Margie 

Preprofessional. 95 Highland Avenue, 
Somerville, Massachusetts 

Mic 2; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Curriculum Committee 4; Pan American 

1, 2. 
Subtle sense of humor. 

MARY LOUISE KELLEY 
Mary Lou 

Preprofessional. 165 Standish Road, 
Watertown, Massachusetts 

Executive Board 4; Le Cercle Francais 1, 3; 

Mic 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Old faithful. 

AUDREY ANNE KIEFER 
Ree 

Library Science. 507 Parsons Street, 
Easton, Pennsylvania 

Assembly Committee 2, 3; Class Publicity 
Chairman 3; Honor Boar J 2, 4, Chairman 
4; Junior Welcome Committee; Stu-G Rep- 
resentative. 

Smiling, cheerful efficiency. 

PATRICIA KIHN 
Pat 

Science. 975 Fernwood Avenue, Plain- 
field, New Jersey 

Bluettes Accompanist 2, 3, 4; Ellen Richards 
4; Fire Captain 2; House Chairman 1; 
Junior Prom 3; Stu-G Representative 4. 

Westward Ho! 





GRACE MARILYN KILEY 

Gay 

Business. 54 Gallivan Boulevard, Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts 

Curriculum Committee 3; Mimeograph Com- 
mittee Chairman 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Executive Board 3; Scribunal 2, 3, 4. 

Petite, peppy, and personality plus. 

DOROTHY KNOX 
Dottie 

English. 106 Fair Oaks Avenue, Newton- 
ville, Massachusetts 

Baccalaureate 3; Commencement 3; Daisy 
Chain 3; News Associate Managing Edi- 
tor 3, 4; Pan American 1; President's Re- 
ception 3; Dramatic 1, 2, 3, 4; English 1, 
2, 3; Mic 2, 3; Review 4. 

AH around enthusiast. 



105 



ILKA OTILIE KOSTAL 



Business. Praha 
Czechoslovakia 

Graduate Assistant 3, 
News 3, 4; NSA 
YWCA 3, 4. 

Cosmopolitan. 



VII, Belskeho 22, 

4; Lisle Fellowship 3, 4; 
3, 4; DP Project 3, 4; 



ANNE KYRIACOPOULOS 
Shea 

Library Science. 819 Chelmsford Street, 
Lowell, Massachusetts 

Christmas Pageant Chairman 2, 3; Dorm 
Council 3; Dramatic 1, 2, Secretary 3; 
Junior Prom 3; House Chairman 3; Olde 
English Dinner 4; Orthodox 1, 2, Secretary- 
Treasurer 3; Outing 1; Pan American 1, 2; 
PCA 2, 3, Treasurer 3; President's Recep- 
tion 3; 0-20 2. 3. 4. 










ELLAINE MURRAY LaCOURSE 
Lainy 

Library Science. 57 George Street, Bris- 
tol, Massachusetts 

Glee Club 1; House Chairman 3, 4; Mic 2, 3, 
Photography Editor 4; Newman 1, 2, 3; 
YWCA 1, 2; 020 3, 4. 

Future ahead ... a Derick needed. 



M. JEANNINE LALLY 
Jean 

Science. 72 '/ 2 High Street, Milford, Mas- 
sachusetts 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1. 

Scientifically speaking ... a miss(ed) 
career. 



ELEANOR WHITCHER LAW 
Lee 

Preprofessional. 9 Garland Street, Lynn, 
Massachusetts 

Curriculum Committee 2, 3; Graduation Usher 
3; Senior Luncheon 3; NSA Committee 3, 4. 
Loyal friend, personality plus! 



HELEN D. LELECAS 

Business. 75 Monastery Road, Brighton, 
Massachusetts 

Dance Committee 3, 4; Orthodox 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Pan American 1. 
Twinkling eyes and friendly smile. 



106 



SHIRLEY CLAIRE LELPOLD 
Nursing. 27 Harvard Road, Belmont, 
Massachusetts 

Junior Welcome Committee; Sopli Luncheon 
2; Anne Strong 2. 



GLORIA LEAH LEV1NE 
Glo 

Preprofessional. 7 Gardner Street, Salem, 
Massachusetts 

Hillel 2, 3, 4; IZFA 1, 2, 3, 4. 
•'Where's Vivian?" 





107 



RITA ELIZABETH ANNE LEYS 
Home Economics. 137 B.iss Road, New- 
port, Rhode Island 

Ring Standardization 1; Glee Club 1, 2; 
Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Home Ec Publicity 
Chairman 1, 2. 3, 4; Outing; YWCA 1, 2, 

Always smiling. 



MONA HELENE LIPOFSKY 

Preprofessional. 275 Winthrop Avenue, 
New Haven 11, Connecticut 

PCA; Forum. 



RARBARA FAY LIPSHIRES 
hippy 

Science. 130 Fuller Street, Brookline, 
Massachusetts 

Daisy Chain 3; Hillel 1, 2: IZFA 1. 2; Usher 

Graduation 3. 
Knitting, flitting and jokes. 



ELAINE LIPTON 
Myrt 

Business. 523 Farm Street, New Bedford, 
Massachusetts 

Hillel 1. 2, 3; Mic 4; News Advertising Man- 
ager 3, 4; Nurses' Party 3; Scribunal 3, 4; 
YWCA 3; Junior Jamboree 3; Transfer 
Committee 4. 

It's fab, dynamic and hysterical. 



^6 





MARGARET ELIZABETH LOHSE 

Peg 

Preprofessional. Westwood Park, Altle- 
boro, Massachusetts 

Graduation Chcir 3; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Olde 
English Dinner 3; Outing 1, 2; President's 
Reception 3; Spanish 1; Volunteer Service 
Organization Committee 3. 

"My wallet. Where'H we eat?" 



JOYCE LORING 

Business. 27 Hopedale Street, Allston, 
Massachusetts 

Scribunal 1. 
It's Tuesday. 

KATHLEEN EMMA LURENZ 
Kathy 

English. 48 Burton Street, Walton, New- 
York 

Glee Club 1; Mic 2, 3; Junior Welcome 3; 

Student Helper 2.. 3; Senior Representative 

to Honor Board 4; Review 4. 
Smiling eyes, Boh on her mind. 



MARY LOU McGLOUGHLIN 
Lou 

Business. 8 Washington Street, Stone- 
ham, Massachusetts 

Glee Club 1; Pan American 1; Scribunal 2, 
3, 4; YWCA 2. 



J E ANNETTE McKEE 
Jeannie 

Library Science. 186 Main Street, Lan- 
caster, New Hampshire 
YWCA 2, 3; 020 2, 3, 4. 
Any more coffee? 



ELIZABETH LOUISE McKINNON 

Betty 

Nursing. 48 Adams Street, Melrose, Mas 

sachusetts 
Friendly miss with ready smile. 




108 




■ 



M ' 



ISOBEL AMES MACLEOD 
Nursing. 8 High Street, North Wilming- 
ton, Massachusetts 

Stu-G Representative; Glee Club; Anne 
Strong 2, 4, 5; President 3; Junior Wel- 
come Committee. 

"I have a date in five years." 



LESLIE ELIZABETH McMORDIE 
Les 

Nursing. 22 Venner Road, Arlington, 
Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 3, 4; Outing 1, 2; Pan Ameri- 
can 1; Junior Welcome Committee. 
Tomorrow ! 

MARJORIE CATHERINE McNULTY 

Midge 

Business. 190 Perham Street, West Rox- 
hury, Massachusetts 

Academy 4; Curriculum Committee 2; Com- 
mencement 3; Newman, Vice-President 3, 
President 4; President's Reception 3; 
Scribunal Vice-President 3; Class Treas- 
urer 4: Soph Luncheon Chairman 2. 

Perfect combination: Beauty and brains. 

LOIS ESTHER MAGOON 

Cokey 

Science. Gilman, Vermont 

House Chairman 1; May Day Committee 2; 
Song Leader 3; Junior Welcome Com- 
mittee 3; Academy 3, 4; Glee Qui 1; 
Cheer Leader 2, 3, 4; Executive Board 3. 

121 pounds of fun. 



FLORENCE CLAIRE MAISEL 

Nursing. 349 Crown Street, Brooklyn, 
New York 

Glee Club 2; Hillel 1; Prince 1; Pan Ameri- 
can 1. 



BARBARA JEAN MALOUIN 
Prince. 1880 Commonwealth Avenue, 
Brighton 35, Massachusetts 

Freshman Formal 1 ; Outing 1 ; YWCA 1 ; 
Pan American; Mic Formal 4; Prince 3, 4. 
Sparkling personality. 




109 







JEAN ANN MANNON 

Prince. 935 State Street, Lima, Ohio 

Transferred from Flora Stone Mather Col- 
lege 3; Prince; Hobo Party. 
"Better she were dead." 



JANINE ELIZABETH MARJOLLET 

Jan 

English. 585 Washington Street, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts 

Compets 1, 2, 3, Directing 4; Dramatic 1, 2, 
3, 4; Le Cercle Francais 1, 2, Secretary 3, 
President 4. 

Sweetness, attractiveness, friendliness. 



MARJORIE GRACE MARKS 

Margie 

Preprofessional. 100 Hutchings Street, 
Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Academy 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4. 
No relation to Karl. 



MARY E. MARSTON 
Business. Kezar Falls, Maine 

Scribunal 3, 4; Glee Club 2; Ellen Richards 

2; Song Leader 4. 
A typical Maine-iac, A-yeh! 



•,; 



JANE OLIVE MATTHEWS 
Nursing. 8 Shaw Road, Wellesley Hills, 
Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 2; Glee Club 1, 2; Outing 1, 2. 



JOAN RAE MILLER 
Jo 

Library. 200 Freeman Street, Brookline, 
Massachusetts 

Transferred from Wheaton College 020 3, 4. 
Many lively tales she's told. 





"«** > 



110 



LORRAINE MILLER 

Library Science. Soelus, New York 

Dorm Board 4; Dorm Council 3, 4; Fund 

Drive 4; 0-20 2, 3, 4. 
Sweet Lorraine. 



MARY ANN MILLER 

Prince. 2818 N.W. Beuhla Vista Terrace, 
Portland. Oregon 

Transferred from University of Oregon 3; 

Prince; Transfer Committee. 
Epitome of sincerity. 



CAROLYN GODFREY MILLINGER 
Kay 

Preprofessional. Chebeacpie Island. 

Maine 

Academy 3, Treasurer 4; PCA 2, 3; YWCA 1. 
Chebeaque Sal. 



MARY MARTHA MONAHAN 

Preprofessional. 472 Canton Street, 
Stoughton, Massachusetts 

Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Open House Usher 2. 
Friendly and sincere. 





JOAN ALICE MONTGOMERY 
Science. 8 Howe Stret, Dorchester, Mas- 
sachusetts 

Academy 3, 4; Secretary 4; Executive Board 
3; Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Junior Prom 3; 
Outing 1, 2. 
See you in organic lab. 



FRANCES MAE MOORE 
Fran 

Preprofessional. 8 Stonehedge Road, 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Dramatic 4; Modern Dance 3, 4; Outing 1, 

2, 3, 4, President 2, Secretary 4. 
Shall I cut my hair? 



Ill 



HELEN RUTH MOORE 
English. 8 Sycamore Street, Somerville, 
Massachusetts 

English 3, 4; Hillel 1, Secretary 2, Executive 
Board 3, Program Chairman 4; IZFA 1, 2, 
Social Chairman 3, Vice-President 4; Out- 
ing 1; Riding 4. 



JEAN HARRIET MORGAN 
Business. 276 Quincy Avenue, East 
Braintree, Massachusetts 

Bib Party 3; Daisy Chain 3; Graduation Moni- 
tor 3; Mic Business Manager 4; Pan 
American 1; YWCA 1, 2, 3, Secretary 4. 

Must write myself a note! 





JEAN PATRICIA MORRIS 

| Prince. 295 School Street, Berlin, New 
Hampshire 

Dramatic 1, 2; Prince 3, 4; Transfer Commit- 
tee 3; Assistant House Chairman 3; House 
Senior 4. 



FANNY O. MOSES 

Foil 

Science. Gorliam, Maine 

Academy 3, 4; Curriculum Committee 3; 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4. 
Spare Time!! What's that? 



SHIRLEY ANN MOSKOV1TZ 
Moskie 

Prince. 384 Crescent Avenue, Athol, 
Massachusetts 

Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Prince 3, 4; IZFA 1, 2, 

Secretary 1. 
Beauty Like Burgundy — She sparkles! 



GEBTRLDE ELLEN MURRAY 
7«iie 

Science. 842 Edmands Road, Framing- 
ham, Massachusetts 

Academy 3, Reception Chairman 4; Ellen 
Richards 2, 3, President 4; ICC 4; Newman 
1, 2, 3, 4; Olde English Dinner 4; Riding 4. 

Dorm-Commuter spirit. 



112 





DOROTHY SARA NATHAN 
Dotlie 

Prince. 144 Floral Avenue, Maiden, 
Massachusetts 

Hillel 2, 3, 4; IZFA; Scholarship 4. 

SHIRLEY VIRGINIA NEIZER 

Shirt 

Preprofessional. 47 Osgood Street, 
Salem, Massachusetts 

Class Executive Board 2; Curriculum Com- 
mittee Chairman for History 2; English 2; 
NSA 2, Vice-Chairman and Junior Delegate 
Chairman and Senior Delegate; PCA 
Treasurer 2; Stu-G 4; YWCA 1. 

Truly sincere, certainly successful! 



HARRIET ESTHER NELSON 
Home Economics. 287 Stratford Street, 
West Roxbury, Massachusetts 

Daisy Chain 3; ICC Secretary 4; IVCF 1; 
Secretary-Treasurer 2, President 3. 4; Home 
Ec 2, 3, 4; Transfer Committee 4. 



RUTH ANN NELSON 
Ruthif 

Home Economics. 24 Coolidge Avenue, 
Hingham, Massachusetts 

Academy 2; Daisy Chain 3; Home Ec 2, 3, 4; 
President"* Reception Usher 3; Riding 1. 
Sweet and petite. 



ARLENE OLIVIA NORTON 
Rusiness. Sauguoit, New York 

Glee Club 1, 2; Scribunal 2, 3, 4, Tea Chair- 
man 2. 
Lonesome for a certain someone. 



TERESA NOWAK 
Terry 

Home Economics. 186 Payson Road, 
Belmont, Massachusetts 

Dramatic Club Tea Chairman 4; Forum Ex- 
ecutive Board 4; Honor Board Junior Rep- 
resentative; Social Activities 4; Young 
Republicans President 4. 

Love life and pursue happiness. 




113 




BARBARA ALPERIN NOYMER (MRS.) 
Barb 

Prince. 378 The Riverway, Boston, Mas- 
sachusetts 

Prince 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2; Spanish 1. 



MARY JANE OAKLEY 

Fig 

Prince. Lake Shore Road, Geneva-on- 
the-Lake, Ohio 

Bib Party 3; Junior Prom 3; Assembly 3; 

Hobo Party 4; Prince 3, 4. 
The Turtle Tamer. 



JOAN O'CONNOR 

Science. 156 Welles Avenue, Dorchester, 
Massachusetts 

Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Scientifically speaking — promises success. 



NANCY LOUISE O'HARE 
Home Economics. 36 Cedarwood Road, 
Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 

Home Ec 2, 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Traveler. 



BEVERLY MAE ORCUTT 
Bev 

Nursing. 17 Belcher, Holbrook, Massa- 
chusetts 

Orchestra, Secretary 1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Anne Strong 3, 4. 



LILLY ANTONIETA ORIVE 

Preprofessional. 8 Avenue Sur No. 43, 
Guatemala 

Le Cercle Francais 4; International Student 
Association Representative 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan 
American 2, 3, Vice-President 2. 

First Guatemalan graduating from Sim- 





■M 



114 





LORRAINE PHYLLIS PALMISANO 
English. 84 Irving Street, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts 

Dramatic 1; Field Day 2. 
Always in a rush. 



GLORIA ANN PALUMRO 
Nursing. 88 Clarendon Avenue, East 
Lynn, Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 2, 3; Newman 1, 2, 3; Outing 
1, 2. 



LOUISE PATCH 

Preprofessional. North Hartland, Ver- 
mont 

Academy 3, 4. 

You can always laugh. 



MARCIA ELEANOR PAYJACK 
Marc 

Prince. 214 Pearl Street, Medina, New 
York 

Prince 3; Newman 2, 3; Junior Welcome 
Committee 3: Executive Board 3. 



«l «C 



9*5, 



MAXINE ELAINE PAYJACK 
Max 

Prince. 214 Pearl Street, Medina, New 
York 

Prince 3: Newman 2, 3; Junior Welcome 
Committee 3: Executive Board 3. 



LUCILLE ELINOR PERLMUTTER 

Prince. 44 Pond Street, Framingham, 
Massachusetts 

Hillel; IZFA; Dramatic; Prince. 






i 



115 



RITA MAE PERMAN 

Ree 

Prince. 50 Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, 

New York 
"I've got a few things to do." 



CAROL SUSAN PETERSON 
Pete 

Home Economics. 15 Aberdeen Road, 
Milton, Massachusetts 

Bib Party 3; Home Ec 2, 3, Secretary 4; 

YWCA 3. 
Island happy. 



JOAN C. PHILLIPS 

Science. 113 Pleasant Street, Lowell, 
Massachusetts 

Commencement 3; Mic 4; Newman 1, 2; News 

3; Olde English Dinner 3. 
"Let's go to the movies." 



HELOISE PIKE 

English. 40 Cranberry Road, Weymouth, 
Massachusetts 

Transferred from Colby Junior College 2; 
Academy 4; Curriculum Committee 3; Mic 

4; Senior Reception 3. 
Lucidity at its best. 





/ 



\ 





JEAN FINLAYSON POLLEY 

Preprofessional. 189 Wood Street, Lex- 
ington, Massachusetts 

Le Cercle Francais 1; Operetta 3; Outing 2, 

3, 4; YWCA 1, 2, 3. 
Enthusiastic and sincere. 



PATRICIA ANN POWERS 
Pat 

Science. 25 Lee Street, Salem, Massa- 
chusetts 

Academy 3, 4; Executive Board 2, D.P. In- 
formal, Co-chairman 3; Ellen Richards 2, 
3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; Newman 1, 2; Olde 
English 3; Stu-G Vice-President 4. 

Lab scars. 



116 



CAROL ANNE PRESSEY 
Cappy 

Library Science. 113 Morelanfl Streel, 
Somerville, Massachusetts 

Academy 3, 4, President 4; IVCF 1, 2, 3, 4; 
YWCA 1, 2, 3, 4; 020 1, 2, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer 3. 

"Night-before" themes. 



CYNTHIA DIANE RAMIN 
Cinny 

Nursing. 400 Wellesley Avenue, Welles- 
ley Hills, Massachusetts 

Junior Welcome Committee; SDA 1, 2, 3, 
Secretary 1, 2; Anne Strong 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Outing 1, 2. 

Happy talk. 



DELORES JEANETTE REGIJERA 
Science. 97 WooHcliff Street, Roxbury, 
Massachusetts 

Dramatic 3; Ellen Richards 2, 3; Executive 

Board 4, Secretary-Treasurer 2, 3. 
Short and sweet. 



BARRARA REISNER 
Barb 

Library Science. 1284 Commonwealth 
Avenue, Allston, Massachusetts 

Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; IZFA 2, 3, 4, President 3, 4; 

Publicity Chairman 020 2, 3, 4. 
"No comment!" 







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ALICE LAURA RELYEA 

Library Science. Munson Road, Wolcott, 

Connecticut 
020 3, 4. 
"Everything is Jess fine!" 



ROY REPLOGLE 

English. 40 Winchester Street, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts 

Executive Board 2, 3; Freshman Formal Chair- 
man; Junior Prom 3. 
Miss-uh-is this Rov? 



117 



ALICE KEAN RICHARDSON 
Al 

Science. 50 South Main Street, Middle- 
ton, Massachusetts 

Dorm Board 4; Dorm Council 4; Ellen Rich- 
ards 2, 3, 4: Glee Club Social Chairman 
1, 2, 3, 4; Honor Board 4; Newman 1. 

Davev. 



CAROL LORAYNE RICHARDSON 
Ritchie 

Nursing. 100 Lowell Street, Methuen, 
Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 2, 3, 4. 





JOAN RIPLEY 
Rip 

Home Economics. 3 Windemere Circle, 
Braintree, Massachusetts 

Academy 1; Home Ec 3; USSA 1. 
"Let's run for the 4:41!" 



SHIRLEY LOUISE RODGERS 

Rodge 

Preprofessional. 46 Dalton Road, Chelms- 
ford, Massachusetts 

Curriculum Committee 3; Newman 3, 4; News 

3; Scribunal 2. 
A jester at heart. 



ELEANOR GILMORE ROGERS 

Ellie 

Prince. 110 Bradford Avenue, Keene, 

New Hampshire 
Executive Board 1, 2; News 1, 2; Le Cercle 

Francais 1; PCA 3; Prince 3, 4. 



JOAN KELSEY ROOD 
Joe 

Prince. 50 Pearl Street, Meriden, Con- 
necticut 

Prince 3, 4; Fire Captain 3; Transfer Com- 
mittee 3. 
"Filene's!" 



118 



MARJORIE MARY ROSCOE 
Nursing. 101 Longwood Avenue, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts 



DOROTHY JANET ROSE 
Dot 

Business. 4 Menduni Street, Roslindale, 
Massachusetts 

Academy 4; Baccalaureate; Bib Party Co- 
Chairman 3; Daisy Chain 3; Pan Ameri- 
can 1; President's Reception 2, 3; Scribunal 
2, 3, 4, Secretary 2; Soph Shuffle Co- 
Chairman; Stu-G Representative 3, Presi- 
dent 4; YWCA 1, 2. 

Earl the pearl. 







RUTH ROSEN 

Raisen 

Preprofessional. 80 Freeman Street, 
Quincy, Massachusetts 

Bib Party 3; Hillel 1, 2; Outing 2, 3; PCA 

2, 3, Vice-President 2. 
Put the lid on vour id. 




i 



MUZZA ROSENSTEIN 

Science. 250 9th Avenue, San Francisco, 
California 

Ellen Richards 3; Hillel 1, 2, 3; Le Cercle 
Francais 1 ; NSA Foreign Students' Orien- 
tation 2. 

The raging rocks. 



HELEN NORA ROTH 

Preprofessional. 179 Eastford Road, 
Southbridge, Massachusetts 

Academy 3, 4; Daisy Chain 3; Graduation 
Choir 3; Olde English Dinner 3; Volun- 
teer Service Organization 3. 

Little one. 



MINERVA AMES RUSSELL 
Babe 

Preprofessional. 455 Clinton Street, New 
Bedford, Massachusetts 

Mic 4, Dance Ticket Chairman 4. 
What a good egg!! 



119 




BARBARA ELIZABETH SARGENT 

Prince. 177 Lexington Avenue, Water- 
town, Massachusetts 



BERNICE SAUNDERS 
Rea 

English. 421 Central Street, Saugus, 
Massachusetts 

Baccalaureate 3; Bookstore Representative 4; 

Commencement 3; Hillel 1, 2. 
Who says silence is golden? 



JOSEPHINE ANN SEELSI 
Jo 

Nursing. 23 Daniels Avenue, Pitlsfield, 
Massachusetts 



VIVIAN SCHELL 

Viv 

Preprofessional. 24 Bicknell Street, Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts 

Hillel 1, 2, 3; IZFA 1, 2, 3, 4; JNF Chair- 
man. 
"Where's Gloria?" 



ROSEMARY SCHOTT 

Business. 70 Birch Street, Clinton, Mas- 
sachusetts 

Baccalaureate, Commencement 3; Junior Wel- 
come 3; Mimeograph Committee 4; Scribu- 
nal 2, 3, 4. 

Sweetlv conscientious. 



ANNE ARUNDEL SCHUMAN 
Schumy 

Preprofessional. 1009 Bryn Mawr, Or- 
lando, Florida 

Evans Social Activities Chairman 4; Mic For- 
mal 4; Stu-G Social Activities Representa- 
tive 3. 

2000 pages, 6 papers — due tomorrow. 




120 




ALICE MARIE SEELINGER 

It 

Home Economics. 4 Avon Street, Cam- 
bridge, Massachusetts 

Home Ec 2, 3, 4; Outing 2; YWCA 3. 

NATALIE BEATRICE SHEA 
ISal 

Business. 169 Summer Street, Gardner, 
Massachusetts 

All-College Fund Drive 2; Junior Welcome 
Committee 3; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; News 3; 
Outing 2; Scribunal 2, 3, Treasurer 4; 
Soph Luncheon 2; Stu-G Assistant Treas- 
urer 3, Treasurer 4. 

Million $ personality. 

SHIRLEY EILEEN SHERAD 
English. 42 Lancaster Street, Quincy, 
Massachusetts 

Baccalaureate 2, 3; Daisy Chain 3; English 

2, 3, Treasurer 4; Glee Club 2, 4; Gradua- 
tion Choir 2, 3; Hillel 1, 3, 4; News 1. 2, 

3, 4; Poster Committee 1. 

EUGENIA SIKALIS 

Jennie 

English. 256 Ruggles Street, Boston, 
Massachusetts 

Commencement 3; English 2, 3; Mic Adver- 
tising Manager 4; NSA 2, 3, 4; News 3, 4; 
Operetta 3; Orthodox 1, 2, 3, 4; Pan Ameri- 
can 1 ; President's Reception 3. 

Eyes expressive — effervescent. 



MARY THERESE SIMS 
Prince. 411 Hamilton Crescent, Clear- 
water, Florida 

Transferred from Florida State University. 
Prince 3, 4, Social Chairman 4; Newman. 
"That's for getting me excited." 



MINNIE BARR SMITH (MRS.) 
Min 

Science. 46 Fisher Avenue, Roxbury, 
Massachusetts 





121 




ROSLYN ETHEL SOLOMON 
Roz 

Prince. 139 Fern Street, Waterbury, 
Coiineeticnt 

Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 1, 2; IZFA 2; Prince 
3, 4; News 2, 3; Daisy Chain 2; Senior 
Prom 4. 



JANICE NADINE STREMLAU 
Jan 

Home Economics. 206 Auburn Road, 
West Hartford, Connecticut 

Home Ec 2, 3, Food Chairman 4; Soph 

Shuffle 2. 
"I'm Crushed." 



GLADYS SUTHERLAND 

Business. 138 Sherman Street, Belmont, 

Massachusetts 
Alwavs tired. 



MARTHA ELIZABETH SVENSON 
Home Economics. 45 Sheridan Drive, 
Milton, Massachusetts 

County Fair Fashion Show 2; Home Ec 3, 4; 

IVCF 3, 4; Outing 1; Soph Luncheon 2. 
Terrific knitter. 



ELSIE TAIT 

Nursing. 31 Western Avenue, Glen Falls, 
New York 

Academy 4; Stu-G Executive Board 3. 
Spirited. 



KATHERINE ROBERTA TALBOT 
Kathy 

Home Economics. 68 Clark Road, Low- 
ell, Massachusetts 

Campus Fire Chief 4; Home Ec 3, 4; House 
Treasurer 2; Outing 1; Pan American 1; 
YWCA 4. 

Tigers are no problem. 




122 



CLAIRE EDNATA THEALL 
Science. 88 Gordon Street, Brighton, 
Massachusetts 

Academy 3, 4; Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; New- 
man 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Neat, nice, nifty. 

MARILYN JEANNE THOMAS 
Tommip 

Prince. 520 Wyoming Avenue, Milburn, 
New Jersey 

Outing 1; Glee Club 1, 2; Dramatic 1, 2, 3, 
4; Soph Luncheon 2; Olde English Dinner 
3; Compets 2, 3; Spring Production 2, 3; 
Commencement Usher 3; May Court 2; 
Senior Luncheon 2; Prince 4; Baccalau- 
reate 3. 

Successor to Dior. 

BARBARA ANNE THOMPSON 
Barb 

Science. 104 Kieth Street, West Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts 

Daisy Chain 3; Ellen Richards 2, 3, 4; Grad- 
uation Usher 3; President's Reception 
Usher 3. 

Quiet Smile. 

MARIAN JUDITH TIDMANSEN 
Business. 12 Shawmut Street, Quincy, 
Massachusetts 

All-College Fund Drive Representative 3; 

Class Vice-President 4; ICC President 4; 

Scribunal 3, 4; Soph Shuffle 2. 
My Buddy. 





KATHERINE BREHM TILTON 
Kathy 

Home Economics. Chilmark, Massachu- 
setts 

Home Ec 1, 2, 3, 4. 
"Kathy, telephone!" 



DOROTHY ANN TOMKO 
Dofrie 

Home Economics. 39 Jane Street, Shel- 
ton, Connecticut 

Bookstore Representative 4; Hobo Party 4; 

Home Ec 3, 4; Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior 

Luncheon Chairman 4. 
A strong "Arch" supporter. 



123 



RUBY WINIFRED TUPPER 
Preprofessional. 19 North Main Street, 
Avon, Massachusetts 

Academy 3, 4; Curriculum Committee 1, 2; 

Glee Club 1. 
The gem her name implies. 



MARY J. VAN DER MERLEN 
Business. 28 Ardmore Road, West New- 
ton, Massachusetts 

Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 1; Pan American 

1; Scribunal 2, 3, 4. 
Full of life and wit. 





JOYCE D. WALKER 
Joy 

Nursing. 2493 Alhany Avenue, West 
Hartford, Connecticut 

Anne Strong 1, 2, 3. 
Smiles versus seriousness. 



BARBARA JEAN WASON 
Barby 

Science. 21 Allen Avenue, Waban, Mas- 
sachusetts 

Class Executive Board 1; Ellen Richards 3, 
4; Olde English Dinner 4; Stu-G Social 
Activities Board 3; YWCA 1. 

Lab pains and stains. 



E. EUNICE WATERBURY 

Eun 

Nursing. Poundridge, New York 

Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; Fund Follies 2; IVCF 

2; Junior Welcome Committee. 
Likes to stay up all night. 



ARLINE MAY WATTENMAKER 

Arl 

English. 12910 Fairhill Road, Shaker 
Heights, Ohio 

Hillel 1; Mic Literary Editor 4; News Asso- 
ciate Managing Editor 1, 2; Outing 1; 
PCA Publicity Chairman 2, 3. 



124 




NANCY ELIZABETH WEBB 
Nance 

English. 7 .Summit Road, Hamden, 
Connecticut 

Academy 3, 4; Cap and Gown Chairman 4; 
College Voucher 4; Dorm Council Secre- 
tary 4; House Chairman 3; House Senior 
4; Junior Welcome Committee; YWCA 
1, 2. 

I've got so much to do! 



PATRICIA ANN WELCH 
Pat 

Business. 1103 State Road, North 
Adams, Massachusetts 

Newman 1; Soph Shuffle Co-Chairman 2: 

Class Executive Board 2. 
The eves have it. 



JOCELYN ANN WHITE 
Jos 

English. 33 Washington Avenue, An- 
dover, Massachusetts 

News Assistant Technical Editor 2, Technical 
Editor 3, Editor-in-Chief 4; Orchestra 1; 
Outing 1; Sophomore Luncheon 2; Stu-G 
Representative. 

G.B.S. — a relation? 




CHRISTIE WHITEHILL 

Chris 

Home Economics. Passumpsic, Vermont 

Home Ec 3, 4. 



BARBARA SONYA WHITESTONE 
Prince. 117 Columhia Avenue, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts 



DOROTHY ROSE WHITTEMORE 
Dottie 

Business. 1 East Street, Stoneham, 
Massachusetts 








125 




JUNE WILNER 
Willie 

Preprofessiona!. 377 Turner Street, 
Auburn. Maine 

Dramatic. 1; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; IZFA 1, 2, 3, 4; 

NSA 2, Public Relations Chairman 3, 4; 

Outing 1. 
I'll never forget . . . 

IRENE WIRONEN 
Irena 

English. 49 Peabody Street, Gardner, 
Massachusetts 

English 1; Glee Club 2, 3; Mic 4; News 3, 4; 

Outing 4; Transfer Committee 4. 
A character with characters. 



RARBARA ANN WOLFSON 
Prince. 1515 Beacon Street, Brookline, 
Massachusetts 

Hillel Executive Board, Social Chairman; 
Prince. 



AUDREY JOAN WONG 
Home Economics. 56 Beach Street, Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts 

Home Ec 2, 3, 4; YWCA 1. 

Creamed Chipped Beef — Curried Rice. 



BARBARA GRACE WORTHEN 
Barb 

Library Science. 48 Eaton Avenue, Cam- 
den, Maine 

Transferred from Whittier College 4. 
Palm to Pine. 



ELIZABETH YOUNG 

Betty 

Business. Mountain Road, North Wil- 
braham, Massachusetts 

Glee Club 1; Scribunal 2, 3, Executive 

Board 4. 
Accounting the time. 




126 




ISABEL ZIEGLER 

/.s/i 

Business. 1 Bayside Drive, Plandome, 
Long Island, New York 

Campus Athletic Chairman 2; Campus Bridge 
Chairman 3; Honor Board 3; House Chair- 
man 1, 2, 3; House Senior 4; Newman 1; 
News Advertising Manager 2; Scribunal 1, 
4; YWCA 1. 

How about a fourth? 

VERA BRADSHAW ADAMS 

Nursing. 123 Anne Street, Takoma Park, 

Maryland 
That Virginia gal! 



BARBARA MARY BARRY 
Science. 150 Jason Street, Arlington, 
Massachusetts 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Modern Dance 2, 3; New- 
man 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing 1, 2; Executive 
Board 3. 

Sports and music long, low laugh. 



JANET AUSTIN BENTLEY (MRS.) 
Business. 53 Raleigh Road, Belmont 78, 
Massachusetts 



SARA LOU BERGER 

Sally 

Nursing. 76 Rockwell Avenue, Nauga- 

tuck, Connecticut 
Outing 2. 
"Wait for Baby!" 



VERNA LESSER BURNIM (MRS.) 
Preprofessional. 221 Rice Avenue, Re- 
vere, Massachusetts 

Hillel 1. 2. 4; Executive Board 4; Le Cercle 
Francais 1. 





\ 




127 



KATHERINE G. CAVOURES 

Casey 

Nursing. 444 Fletcher Slreet, Lowell, 
Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 2; Curriculum 
Committee 2: Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Junior 
Welcome Committee; Orthodox 1, 2, 3, 4, 
President 3. 

A one-man cheering section. 

NATALIE HAMMOND CONDON (MRS.) 
Ham 

Business. 43 Linden Street, Allston. 
Massachusetts 

Drama 3, 4; May Day 2; Olde English Din- 
ner 3; YWCA 2. 
A small bundle of dvnamite. 




RUTH MERRIAM COOLIDGE 
Preprofessional. South Street, Peter- 
sham, Massachusetts 



VIRGINIA HOPE DALEY 

Nursing. 222 4th Street, Providence 6, 
Rhode Island 

Newman 1, 2, 3, 4; Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; 

Junior Welcome Committee; May Day 2. 
"Well, Jack said . . ." 





WINIFRED DICKERMAN 
Winnie 

Prince. 187 Central, Somerville, Massa- 
chusetts 

Hillel Treasurer 2; IZFA Treasurer 2; Out- 
ing; Prince 3, 4. 



LORNA CRAIG DILL 
Dillle 

Nursing. 145 Washington Street, Bel- 
mont, Massachusetts 



128 



JEAN ELIZABETH FULLER 
Nursing. 53 Greenfield Street, Brockton, 
Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 2, 3, Secretary 3; Junior Wel- 
come Committee; Pan American 3. 
Sunny. 



AUDREY JOAN GREENLAW 
Prince. 5 Chestnut Street, Melrose, Mas- 
sachusetts 

Newman 1; Dramatic 1. 



ELIZABETH JANE HAYDEN 
Betty Jane 

Nursing. 735 High Street, Fall River, 
Massachusetts 

Dorm Council 1; Dorm Board 1; Outing 1. 



MARJORIE IIEYWOOD 
Mar ni 

Nursing. 85 Elm Street, Gardner, Mas- 
sachusetts 

Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2. 









• 



SHIRLEY JUDITH HOLMES 
Prince. 36 Bellevue Avenue, Norwood, 
Massachusetts 



ROMAYNE LAYAOU 
Ronnie 

Nursing. 24 Daniel Street, Newton Cen- 
ter, Massachusetts 

Riding Club 1; Drama 1. 
Short and Sweet. 



129 





\* 




MARGARET HALLIWELL LONGLEY 
Peg 

Science. 144 Elmwood Road, Verona, 
New Jersey 

Curriculum Committee 2; Class Secretary 1; 

Dramatic 1, 2, Vice-President 3; Graduation 

Usher 3; May Breakfast Chairman 2. 
Always "bunimin' " around — vitality ! 

ELEANOR AGNES LOVE 
Ellie 

Home Economics. 29 Loveland Road, 
Brookline, Massachusetts 

Home Ec 2, 3; Outing 1; Newman 1, 2. 
"Where's your suitcase today, El?" 



RUTH LOIS MUELLER 
Prince. 101 East Devon, 
Wisconsin 



Milwaukee, 



JOANNE EDITH NELSON 
Preprofessional. 629 Washington Street, 
Wellesley 81, Massachusetts 



MARIE NOUSSEE 
Rickey 

Nursing. 77 Beechcroft Street, Brighton, 
Massachusetts 

Orthodox 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Veritable fashion plate. 



LOUISE MARIE O'SULLIVAN 

Sully 

Nursing. 11 Lexington Street, Belmont, 

Massachusetts 
Why? How? Please explain! 




130 



ROBERTA M. RODES (MRS.) 
Bobbie 

Preprofessional. 4234 Wawona Street, 
Los Angeles, California 

Christian Science 3; Curriculum Committee 4; 

Dramatic 4. 
The arts, philosophy. 



MARJORIE ANN SCHNEIDER 
Marge 

English. 84-25 Edgerton Boulevard, 
Jamaica, New York 

Transferred from Queens College 3; Review 
Art Editor 4. 



KATHERINE RUTH SMITH 

Katy 

English. 200 Rockland Street, Hingham, 
Massachusetts 



BEVERLY ANNE TERRY 
Bev 

Home Economics. 135 Crestview Drive, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Home Ec 2, Vice-President 3, President 4; 
Stu-G Social Activities Representative 4; 
Stu-G Executive Board 3. 





JENNIE HELEN PELLEGRINI 
Jen 

Library Science. 527 Crescent Street, 
Brockton, Massachusetts 

Executive Board 4; 0-20 2, 3, 4. 



* 



131 



BARBARA ANN ASHCBOFT 
Bash 

Nursing. 20 Loring Street, Islington, 
Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2; 1VCF 2. 
International Relations! 



CYNTHIA COUSINS 
Cuz 

Nursing. Mt. Pleasant Street, North Bil- 
lerica, Massachusetts 

Anne Strong 2, 3, 4; Soph Luncheon 2. 
Professional pessimist. 



MARY EILEEN BRENNAN 

Nursing. 176 Hawkins Street, Derby, 

Connecticut 
Entertains all with sparkling conversation. 



MARY ALLEN CREAN 

Nursing. 55 West Highland Street, Mel- 
rose, Massachusetts 



BETTE LEE CARVER 

Preprofessional. 239 Beverly 
Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 



Boad, 



LOUISA HYDE EDWABDS 

Nursing. 12 Maple Avenue, 

Springs, New York 
Coffee and eig lover. 



Saratoga 



CHRISTINE JOAN CELIA 
Preprofessional. 89 Wheeler 
Brockton 23, Massachusetts 



Avenue, 



LUCY MABSHALL CHAMBEBLAIN 

Nursing. 78 Downing Street, Worcester, 
Massachusetts 



PATRICIA LOIS FERROLI 
Pal 

Library Science. 10 Hamilton Street, 
Dorchester 25, Massachusetts 



NANCY KATHERINE CONLIN 
Science. 156 Babcock Street, Brookline 
46, Massachusetts 



FRANCES NOONAN FOLEY (MRS.) 
Nursing. 44 Elliot Avenue, North Quincy 
71, Massachusetts 



NAOMI THRESHER COLYER (MRS.) 
English. 38 Westgate Street, Cambridge 
39, Massachusetts 



WILLETTA MOSSER GARDNER (MRS.) 
Nursing. 326 Dartmouth Street, Boston, 
Massachusetts 



SADIE ANN COBEY 

Nursing. 385 Howe, Methuen, Massachu- 
setts 



LESLIE ISABEL HABRIS 
Nursing. 14 Poplar Place, 
Massachusetts 



Boston 14, 



132 



MURIEL BLACKWELL HOEPRICH 

(MRS.) 
Nursing. 460 Huntington Avenue, Bos- 
Ion, Massachusetts 



ELIZABETH HAMILTON SELBY (MRS.) 
Nursing. 20 Hansborough Street, Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts 



LOUISE SHARKO HOLTHAUS (MRS.) 
Nursing. 18 Whitby Terrace, Dorchester, 
Massachusetts 



SHIRLEY MARION SIMENDINGER 
Prince. 28 Olnay Avenue, Water town, 
Massachusetts 



MARY LUCY INNOCENTE 

Nursing. 294 Diamond Hill Road, Woon- 

socket, Rhode Island 
Traveling, entertaining al home. 



MELBA WOODWARD SMITH 

Library Science. New Hampton, New 
Hampshire 



LILLIAN RENA LADD 

Nursing. 139 Cass Street, Portsmouth. 
New Hampshire 

Class President 1, 2; Compels 2; Dramalic 1, 
2, 3; IVCF 2, 3, Vice-President 3; Junior 
Welcome Committee Chairman; Curriculum 
Commitlee 2, 3. 

Subtle like a bomb. 



PATRICIA MORELAND SMITH (MRS.) 
Home Economics. 1308 Ashland Avenue, 
Santa Monica, California 

Transferred from University of California. 



LILLIAN G. LEWIS 

Library Science. 127 Bristol Street, New- 
Haven, Connecticut 

Transferred from Hampton Institule. 



MARGIE PLUSS WALDMAN (MRS.) 
Marge 

Nursing. 5747 North Central Park, Chi- 
cago, Illinois 
Exam worries. 



LOIS LOWREY 

Nursing. 310 East Frierson Avenue. 
Tampa, Florida 



BERTE ALICE WEINBEBGER 
Bertie 

Nursing. 109 George Street, Providence, 
Rhode Island 

Transferred from University of Colorado. 

NSA; Riding. 

Always getting lost in Boston. 



MARY ELIZABETH MURPHY 
Murph 

Nursing. 37 Parker Street, Ware, Massa- 
chusetts 

Stn-G Executive Board 4. 



JEAN WILLIAMS 

Nursing. 19 Creek Road, Wrentbam. 
Massachusetts 



133 




MICROCOSM BOARD 

EDITOR 
VIRGINIA LEE BOWN 



Associate Editor 
Elsie Frabotta 

Literary Editor 
Arlene Wattenmaker 



Business Manager 
Jean Morgan 

Photography Editor Circulation Manager 
Ellaine LaCourse Barbara Brown 



Assistant 
Literary Editor 



Helc 



Pike 



Assistant 
Photography Editor 

Margo Happ 



Technical Editor 
Jennie Suarino 



Art Editor 

Ellen Gould 



Contributing Editor 
Minerva Ames Russell 



Literary Staff 
Carol Diamond 
Nancy Ershler 
Joan Idestrom 
Mary Louise Kelley 
Eleanor Rogers 
Bernice Saunders 
Roslyn Solomon 
Carol Steinberg 
Jocelyn White 



Circulation Staff 
Annabel Ayer 
Mary Calahan 
Jeannette DiRusso 
Carolyn Hax 
Irene Wironen 

Technical Staff 
Loretta Czarnecki 
Jeanne Gardner 
Marion Johnston 



Advertising Manager 

Jennie Sikalis 

Publicity Director 
Dale Barraclough 

Assistant Editor 
Elaine Lipton 

Advertising Staff 
Helen Lelecas 
Anty Pappajohn 
Joan Phillips 
Minnie Vallacellis 
Ernestine Weber 
Rose Yannoulas 

Art Staff 
Alice Barbalian 
Polly Black 
Marjorie Schneider 



134 



Ad 



vertisements 



135 



Solid Intensive Training. Individual 
Advancement. Day and Evening. 

HICKOX 

SECRETARIAL SCHOOL 



Beginning or advanced 
178 Tremont Street Small Classes 

Boston, Mass. Start Each Monday 



Telephone Liberty 2-3983 

PARAMOUNT 
UNIFORM CO. 

Custom-Made 
Uniforms 

We Carry a Full Line of 
READY-TO-WEAR UNIFORMS 

Plus 

LAB COATS, SLIPS, HOSIERY 

AND ACCESSORIES 

577 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 



Cloth 



es 



mean MORE 

cost LESS 

when you make your own.' 

Carrying out your own ideas in color 
— working out your own variations of 
the basic fashion themes — is reward- 
ing! Especially with such variety and 
value as you'll find when you shop 
here! 

MAIL ORDERS FILLED 



Th 



HRESHER 

83 West Street, Boston 



It costs no more 
to dine 
\)/S\ in the 

BALINESE 
ROOM 



^ it's the HOTEL 

for fine foods 



AND IT'S THE LOUIS XIV ROOM FOR 
PARTIES, BANQUETS AND DANCES. 




136 



Once again . . . 



MICROCOSM reflects the life and 

spirit of the students at 

Simmons College 



Complete photographic service by 

SARGENT STUDIO 



154 BOYLSTON STREET 
BOSTON 



V 



Photography Design Technical Assistance 



137 



Symphony Hall 

POPS 



65th Season 



ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor 



OPENING 



Tuesday, May 2nd 



SIMMONS NIGHT 
Friday, June 9th 



Switch to Durland's 



Canadian Health Bread. 



A distinctive, different, 
fine flavored bread. 

Baked by 

CE-LEGT BAKING 
COMPANY 



Established 1837 



CApitol 7-5320 



W. H. LERNED & SONS 

"The Third Generation of Buttermen" 

BUTTER, CHEESE AND EGGS 

87 AND 89 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



BEATTIE 

AND 

McGUIRE 

Incorporated 

Boston's Oldest Specialty Shop 

for 

Woolens 
Rayons 



Silks 

Cottons 

Hosiery 



Underwear 
29 Temple Place, Boston Liberty 2-5753 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



THE 



CLASS OF '53 




138 



Collupy & Collupy, Inc. 

Wholesale Fish Dealers 

A 

140 Atlantic Avenue - - BOSTON 

CApitol 7-0366, -7, -8 


Famous for 

GOOD FOODS 

DELICACIES 

PERFUMERY 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 

STORE AT 133 BROOKLINE AVENUE 


STACEY & VASSALLO 
FRUIT COMPANY, Inc. 

Wholesale Distributors 

FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

6 South Market Street at Faneuil Hall 
Boston, Mass LAfayette 3-4860 


Haydn Costume Co., inc. 

COSTUMES for the Amateur Stage, 

Plays, Operas, Carnivals, Pageants, 

Masquerades 


786 WASHINGTON STREET . BOSTON, MASS. 
HAncock 6-4346 


BARNABY, Inc. 

FLORISTS 

LOngwood 7-5625 

11 HARVARD STREET 
BROOKLINE, MASS. 


ENGRAVING - PRINTING 
CRESTS - COATS OF ARMS 

HARPER W. POULSON 

Social and Commercial Stationer 

GREETING CARDS - GIFTS 

Tel. KE 6-7268 547 BOYLSTON ST. 
BOSTON 


WEAR THE POPULAR 

SPALDING "SADDLES" 

WRIGHT & DITSON 

462 BOYLSTON ST. - - . BOSTON, MASS. 


RTf^jR^ Standard 
J^&L? Simmons Ring 


DIEGES & CLUST 

73 Tremont St. Boston 



139 



We Appreciate 

The Friendship and Patronage 

of the students 

of 
Simmons College 

HOTEL STATLER 

D. B. Stanbro 
Manager 


The 

Hi-Da-Way 

Boston's Nicest Eating Place 

Luncheons - Dinners 

Club Luncheons - Class Meetings 

Dinner Parlies 

.'{ Boylston Place (near Colonial Theatre, Boston) 




COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE JUNIOR CLASS 

AND 
Compliments of 
SCRIBUNAL 

School of Business 


"When in town iline at" 

GAMSUN'S 

IT'S AIR-CONDITIONED 
Restauranting All Chinese Delectable Delicacies 

Dinner Music 

21 HUDSON ST., BOSTON 11, MASS. 

„., . ,„ ~ , fHUbbard 2-4797 
Wong Jayne, Mgr. Tel. |D Evonshire 8-8732 


Compliments of a Friend 


Compliments nj 

Thomas Fish Market, Inc. 

1343 BEACON STREET 
BROOKLINE, MASS. 


YUEH'S 

Drop by for a soda or a snack 
between classes! NOW, we have 

FOUNTAIN SERVICE 

CAMPUS RESTAURANT 

257 Brookline Ave. 



140 



To Our Many Friends 

at Simmons . . . 

A special "THANK YOU" 
for your continued loyalty 
to our quality dairy prod- 
ucts and with all good 
wishes for success! 

WHITING MILK 

Company 

(Quality for Over a Century) 


Enjoy These Modern 

Typewriter Features . . . 

with the Underwood LEADER! 

New Duo-Tone Finish • Easy Aetion Touch • 
42 Key Keyboard • Full o" Writing Line • Bark 
Spacer • Right and Left Shift Key • Shift 
Lock • Standard Length Single Color Ribbon • 
Carriage Release Lever • Paper Release Lever • 
Woven Cloth Tape Drawband • Adjustable 
Left Hand Margin • Automatic Line Finder • 
Adjustable Paper Fingers • Coordinated 
Carriage Scale • Pica 10 Pitch Type • Automatic 
Ribbon Reverse • Sturdy Carrying Case 

Sec aurl try the Underwood "Leader" portable 
typewriter at your local Underwood dealer today ! 

UNDERWOOD CORPORATION 

211 Congress Street, Boston 10, Mass. 

Sales and Service Everywhere 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
HILLEL 


Two Fine Names in Boston Music 

Gene Dennis and his orchestra 
Joey Masters and his orchestra 

Management: 
GENE DENNIS 
Columbia 5-3628 


Compliments oj 
the 

ORTHODOX CLUB 


BUSHWAY ICE CREAM 

Since 1882 

"Everybody likes it" 


Daily sight-seeing to all historic points. Deluxe 

buses for local and inter-state charter work. 

When in need for better service, call . . . 

The Gray & Rawdirig Lines 

Room 19 — Copley Plaza Hotel, Boston, Mass. 
Telephone KE 6-2470 


For Poultry . . . 

There's no place like Holmes 

SAMUEL HOLMES, Inc. 

FANEUIL HALL 



141 



YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE 
ON THE DEAN'S LIST 

to know this . . . 

It's dependable, comfortable, eco- 
nomical to travel by train. No delays 
or last-minute cancellations due to bad 
weather to eat up half your weekend or 
vacation. You get home as you planned 
. . . and back in time for your first 
class. 

New low ROUND TRIP coach fares 
save you money! Play It Smart! . . . 



Take it easy . 
Take the 

TRAIN! 




'minute man service" 



George Graham and His Orchestra 

Distinctive Music 

for 

Particular People 
CO 7-2663 



Compliments of 

YWCA 



Compliments 

of the 
Class of 1952 



RED CAB 

OUR TWO RADIO 

In addition to our EXTENSIVE NETWORK 
of telephone BRANCH LINE enables RED 
CAB to provide IMMEDIATE SERVICE in 
any section of BROOKLINE and VICINITY 

AS 7-5000 



NEW 
MOSELEY'S BALLROOM 

"The Country Club of Dancing 

Auditoriums" 

Dedham, Massachusetts, on the Charles 

Dancing Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 
8-12 




0310 

CApitol 7-0311 

0312 



SWAN, NEWTON & CO. 

MEATS AND POULTRY 

FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

BUTTER, CHEESE AND EGGS 

2-8 FANEUIL HALL MARKET 
BOSTON 



142 



FINE YEARBOOKS REQUIRE 



* Imaginative Design 



* Skillful Reproduction 



* Excellent Materials 



JAY'S friendly, helpful service will insure the 
blending of these factors in Your Yearbook 




#^ Publishing Company, Inc., Boston and 

New York 



143 



so 






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